-insert research squee here-

Any research done in relation to the period of Les Misérables, whether for fanfiction or fanart purposes or otherwise.
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Mamselle Miss
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Postby Mamselle Miss » Thu Nov 20, 2008 3:40 am

I hear ya, guys!

I've been doing more research reading lately. And I've got two really crappy letters to edit.

Which brings me to a question. Does anyone know where the following quote came from?

"Give a man a fish, and you feed him for a day. Teach him to fish, and you feed him for life."

I can't remember where the damn thing came from. I want to say either the Bible, or Gandi. If it's the first one, I can use it. If it's the other one, I can't, obviously.
Laughter is not all a bad beginning for a friendship, and it is far the best ending for one.
-Oscar Wilde

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cordeliersclub
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Postby cordeliersclub » Thu Nov 20, 2008 3:44 am

I believe it was Laozi, but I have no idea when Tao Te Ching was first translated...anyone?
les Amis de l'ABC do not laugh at puns.

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bigR
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Postby bigR » Thu Nov 20, 2008 3:56 am

cordeliersclub wrote:
bigR wrote::lol: :lol: :lol:
oh, God, I miss our "nerdy masterwork" discussions on goodness, and innocence, and pre-revolutionary strategy, and imprisoned amis, and crazy theatre plays.


Oh, me too. So much. BigR if you want anyone to read anything....ever...I am clearly frothing at the mouth about the Masterwork but not brave enough to start it.

Happy writing!


You know, if my letter comes out too crappy or you don't like my ideas, I have the very handy "oh-no-that-is-not-what-I-meant-you-misunderstood-it-because-english-is-not-my-first-language" excuse more than ready.
That gives me a certain audacity :wink:
IL N' Y A QUE LE RIDICULE QUI TUE

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bigR
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Postby bigR » Tue Dec 09, 2008 10:59 pm

I believe that these links have not been posted:

men's clothing 1803-1830
http://www.victoriana.com/Mens-Clothing ... ing-1.html

and men's clothing 1830's
http://www.victoriana.com/Mens-Clothing ... -1830.html
(I claim the big brown coat on the second pic!)
IL N' Y A QUE LE RIDICULE QUI TUE

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bigR
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Postby bigR » Fri Mar 20, 2009 4:38 am

I didn't know where to post this. I was going to add just one video to the "further reading" thread, along with the dance hall and fashion links, but well, one video led to another and so, here it is:

A selection of canne, bâton and savate techniques. I know, I know it is mainly grantaire's weird thing, and they are not so very useful links to share but the videos are fun to watch!

The first three links show canne, savate and bâton the way they probably were used in early 19th century, as self-defense and streetfighting techniques:

savate:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ffUa10vI3Q4

baton:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WYQJWlt77tU

canne:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r8LFAwmyChIç


These three are stylized and modernized sporty version of savate and bâton. I’m pretty sure nobody looked like that in the middle of a real streetfight in 1830:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uVG2SmI-Ohw
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FI_iQU0m8ZA
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UHw_mjLg ... re=related

And the last one. This one is SO wonderfully absurd than I’ve watched it already three times.
The “I’m so elegant while I’m fighting a burglar with my refined fencing technique” on 0:45 is hilarious enough, but “savateur ballerina” on 2:13 is even better and “lady on tight skirt and high heels gets attacked but kicks thief’s ass on the street with her umbrella”on 6:33 is definitely priceless!!!
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IKDkBlKEY1g&NR=1
IL N' Y A QUE LE RIDICULE QUI TUE

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Marianne
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Postby Marianne » Wed May 06, 2009 8:21 am

Just found this site: http://www.cadytech.com/dumas/oeuvre.php

Very very extensive catalog of Alexandre Dumas' works, including--and this is the reason I'm putting it here--production details of all of his plays. Theatres, opening nights, number of performances, etc. If you click the link and do a blank search in the 'drame/play' category, it will bring up all his plays, and you can then sort them by date if you are, like me, anal-retentive enough to want to send your Frenchboys to the theatre without actually Making Shit Up.

Of note: "La Tour de Nesle," "the acme of all the Romantic melodramas," opened at the Théâtre de la Porte Saint-Martin a week before Barricade Day.

(Also of note: the Théâtre de la Porte Saint-Martin is still around and still fabulous, and was at one point under the direction of Michel Sardou.)
[Dieu] entend ta voix, ô fille des hommes! aussi bien que celle des constellations; car rien n'est petit pour celui devant lequel rien n'est grand.
- George Sand, Les sept cordes de la lyre

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MmeJavert
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Postby MmeJavert » Wed May 06, 2009 11:34 pm

Marianne wrote:(Also of note: the Théâtre de la Porte Saint-Martin is still around and still fabulous, and was at one point under the direction of Michel Sardou.)



:lol: That man still is, I think, the only one to ever really be Enjolras to me. Michel Sardou is of the win. And now that just begs to have fanfiction involving the theatre and Enjolras in some capacity. *ponders*

Or the nerdy masterwork could just include Enjolras going there. :D
and to this day, she's glided on
always home but so far away
like a word misplaced
nothing said, what a waste

~pearl jam, "dissident"

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MmeBahorel
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Postby MmeBahorel » Wed Jun 24, 2009 8:31 pm

Mass of nerdy sharing, starting with links, then moving on to my Google Library.


History of Medicine at the University of Virginia: French Caricature
Medicine: http://www.hsl.virginia.edu/historical/ ... dicine.cfm
Public Health: http://www.hsl.virginia.edu/historical/ ... health.cfm

Author's Response: Growth in a Traditional Society: The French Countryside. 1450-1815: http://www.history.ac.uk/reviews/paper/phil.html
Author responds to a review of his book and give several useful bits and pieces about rural France, wage relations between city and countryside, that kind of thing.

The French Worker in the Provinces: http://www.uky.edu/~popkin/frenchworker/rice.htm
Part of Popkin's website, which I think you all found already.

Chronology of the French Worker's Movement, 1802-1838: http://www.marxists.org/history/france/1802-1838.htm
English version but links to original French version. This is what told me Hugo got the year of Lallemand's funeral wrong. It is extremely shiny in general.

Structurae Paris: http://en.structurae.de/geo/geoid/index.cfm?ID=13
Structurae is an international architectural database. It consists of logs of major public architecture all over the world, including stuff that no longer exists. The reason I have it bookmarked is that it includes dates of construction, the current status of the structure (demolished, in use, etc), useful history of a structure (for example, it tells me that tolls ended on the Pont des Arts in 1848), and occasionally there are pictures of things that don't still exist.

Cost of Living in Daumier's time: http://www.daumier.org/176.0.html
Dates well documented, intro says where the list came from, and while it begins past our period, the value of the currency was stable enough that you can easily go up to 1838 based on what I know of wages in the relevant period. It's when we get up to 1848 that there is an obvious increase and I'm not sure how rapidly that moved (I'd still use some of those figures, though, for lack of better).

ARTFL Project, University of Chicago: Dictionnaires d'autrefois: http://artfl-project.uchicago.edu/node/17
Historical French dictionaries, completely searchable. No real bearing on anything but extremely shiny.

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MmeBahorel
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Postby MmeBahorel » Wed Jun 24, 2009 9:40 pm

And my Google Library (I have a whole lot more in there, but related to other things)

Louis Blanc, The History of Ten Years: http://books.google.com/books?id=UDsvAAAAMAAJ
In English and complete.

Nina M. Athanassoglou-Kallmyer, French Images from the Greek War of Independence: http://books.google.com/books?id=unXeZpkaxTMC
Partial view but some really good information.

William B. Cohen, Urban Government and the Rise of the French City: Five Municipalities in the Nineteenth Century: http://books.google.com/books?id=4WkKp5-UidMC
Partial view, focuses on Marseille, Lyon, Bordeaux, Toulouse, and Saint-Etienne. Extremely shiny: covers everything from revenue to civil service, education to theatres, police and fire to public health. I need to get a proper copy of this one.

Frederick William John Hemmings, The Theatre Industry in Nineteenth Century France: http://books.google.com/books?id=CN-1_GZJ1CcC
Partial view, and I desperately need to get a real copy of this one, too. Covers everything: curtain times, ticket prices, what types of people frequented which theatres, and that's just part one. It's one third about audiences, one third about actors, and one third about playwrights.

James Jackson Jarves, Parisian Sights and French Principles, Seen Through American Spectacles: http://books.google.com/books?id=UXkDAAAAYAAJ
Complete, from 1854. Jarves was living in Paris and starts his book by talking about housing, then moves on to restaurants, servants, omnibuses, and bath houses, all in the first chapter. There are illustrations. He is also rather weirded out by Catholicism, and he had children, so he also talks about education. Plus his style is terribly fun to read.

Philippe Aries & Georges Duby, eds., A History of Private Life, IV: From the Fires of Revolution to the Great War: http://books.google.com/books?id=q6vPIdkCmzYC
Partial View, unfortunately, this being the shiniest book ever. The chapter titles don't look like much, but trust me. Click on it, then "Search in this book" for "christmas". Watch the shiny unfold. Just start scrolling around past the introduction and you find all kinds of things. I need one of these for my very own.

David I. Kertzer & Marzio Batagli, eds., Family life in the long nineteenth century: http://books.google.com/books?id=9ZBgfkVuWgIC
Partial View, another "flip through to find the shiny" kind of book.

Jeffrey Merrick & Bryant Ragan, eds., Homosexuality in Modern France: http://books.google.com/books?id=yYq9b9SG2QkC
Partial View, with interesting bits in the fourth (revolution and Napoleon) and fifth (1830-1870) chapters.

Rachel Fuchs, Gender and Poverty in Nineteenth Century Europe: http://books.google.com/books?id=dnC6WJWZEP4C
Partial View. This one gave me some good info on women's labour, with structures and pay rates at times. It's international and covers the whole century, so you have to dig, but there's good stuff in there, and it does give a sense of where you can interpolate experiences from other countries.

Clyde Thogmartin, The National Daily Press of France: http://books.google.com/books?id=yexzGHVggokC
Partial view. Scroll to page 45 to hit the Restoration. It's about five pages of good info.

Patrick Barbier, Opera in Paris, 1800-1850: http://books.google.com/books?id=5KGcR3Y_0LIC
Partial View. Covers the Opera side of things, including venues, personnel, financing, complaints about the auditorium, as well as what was actually being performed on the stage. Tends to cut out just as you get to a really good bit.

Extracts in English from Alexandre Dumas' Memoirs: http://books.google.com/books?id=7hQUAAAAYAAJ
Complete, and just what it says on the tin. Dumas makes shit up, but delightfully so. (I actually found this one when looking up the 1824 Salon.)

MacIver Percival, The Fan Book: http://books.google.com/books?id=8YMFAAAAMAAJ
Complete, from 1921. You may want to skip straight to the chapter on Fan Making and Fan Makers, but don't overlook the earlier chapters, which concentrate on style and have references to the market. Mostly focused on the 18th century, unfortunately, but extremely good information. You don't have mechanisation by our period, so the way things are done (and it includes the plates from the Encyclopedie with english translation of the descriptions) has not changed. The quality and care has, but not the basic manufacturing methods.

Matthew Ramsey, Professional and Popular Medicine in France, 1770-1830: http://books.google.com/books?id=f_Qap3_F8x8C
Partial view. Extremely good information on exactly what it says on the tin. Unfortunately, a lot of the good stuff on popular medicine is unavailable.

Colin Heywood, Childhood in Nineteenth Century France: http://books.google.com/books?id=4nLmPLL1Yo8C
Partial view. I can't get to a lot of it, and it tends to cut out when you hit an interesting part, but there's a lot of very good info. Not so much for our bourgeois characters, since it's focused on the working classes, but very good info nonetheless.

The History of Paris from the Earliest Period to the Present Day (a Galigani publication): http://books.google.com/books?id=ulgjvjfSungC
Complete. From 1825. The shiniest part, for me, is if you go to the chapter on "Charitable Institutions and Prisons", it explains the specialisations of all the hospitals and all the prisons. Extremely useful information. I haven't even gone through the rest or looked for the other two volumes (this is vol. 2 of 3).

Gunter Risse, Mending Bodies, Saving Souls: a History of Hospitals: http://books.google.com/books?id=htLTvdz5HDEC
Partial View. Skip down to Chapter 6, Post Revolutionary Paris. The whole chapter is available and it looks like a good starting point if you haven't already been doing heavy research on the period but with occasional good details even if you have been.

Rebecca Rogers, From the Salon to the Schoolroom: Educating Bourgeois Girls in Nineteenth Century France: http://books.google.com/books?id=5GC-jpyfu0oC
Partial View. Extremely good information should you be working with bourgeois female characters.

Marianna Starke, Information and Directions for Travelers to the Continent: http://books.google.com/books?id=kkkpAAAAYAAJ
Complete. From 1829. This is the earliest Galignani I have found on Google Books and thank god I kept looking. Scroll to page 327, where she tells you about money, how to get around, how much things should cost, how many stages there are when taking a coach between major cities, and random helpful notes about inns and things. Did I mention it's from 1829?

There, I'm buying your love through Google Books :)

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Marianne
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Postby Marianne » Wed Jun 24, 2009 9:46 pm

You don't need to buy our love. <3
[Dieu] entend ta voix, ô fille des hommes! aussi bien que celle des constellations; car rien n'est petit pour celui devant lequel rien n'est grand.

- George Sand, Les sept cordes de la lyre

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Col.Despard
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Postby Col.Despard » Wed Jun 24, 2009 10:10 pm

Thank you all - I'm going to be living in the links in this thread for the next few months!
"The principles of freedom, of humanity, and of justice, will finally triumph over falsehood, tyranny and delusion, and every principle inimical to the interests of the human race" - Edward Despard, 1803
http://coloneldespard.deviantart.com/

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Mamselle Miss
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Postby Mamselle Miss » Wed Jun 24, 2009 11:24 pm

Thank you MmeBahorel, I will definitely be adding some of those books to my own Google books library.
Laughter is not all a bad beginning for a friendship, and it is far the best ending for one.

-Oscar Wilde

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MmeJavert
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Postby MmeJavert » Wed Jun 24, 2009 11:32 pm

Okay, there are a number of links within that dump that I have not even seen. I shall have to dive in this weekend. :D
and to this day, she's glided on
always home but so far away
like a word misplaced
nothing said, what a waste

~pearl jam, "dissident"

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Marianne
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Postby Marianne » Tue Jun 30, 2009 1:34 am

http://books.google.com/books?id=-tRkAAAAMAAJ

.......I WANT IT.

"Dans la production littéraire de 1830 tout un ensemble de romans et de nouvelles mettent en scène des histoires d'amour singulières qui ont pour héros des castrats, des hermaphrodites, des homosexuels (et même un zoophile). Il ne s'agit pas de déviances et de perversions pathologiques dont l'intérêt ne serait qu'anecdotique ; ces textes ont bien plutôt valeur de symptôme historique, social et idéologique. D'une part, ils traduisent les dysfonctionnements de la nouvelle socialité qui a vu le jour à la faveur de la révolution de juillet et constituent une dénonciation de la société moderne, d'autre part, pour certains d'entre eux, ils proposent, sur le mode du mythe, l'idéal d'un amour absolu, échappant à toute norme."

Too lazy to translate the synopsis but I WANT IT HARDCORE.

Edit: oh god Mount Holyoke has it I probably wouldn't even have to fill out an ILL form if I wanted to check it out-- *flail*

It's one of those books that appears to be out of print but a bunch of libraries have it. http://www.worldcat.org/oclc/39060978
[Dieu] entend ta voix, ô fille des hommes! aussi bien que celle des constellations; car rien n'est petit pour celui devant lequel rien n'est grand.

- George Sand, Les sept cordes de la lyre

Ulkis
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Postby Ulkis » Tue Jun 30, 2009 1:44 am

I'm guessing zoophiles means what I think it means?

Sounds like a very interesting book.


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