Translations of the musical movie

Go on about how awful the movie adaptations were here.
User avatar
Trompe-la-Mort
Posts: 599
Joined: Sat Feb 19, 2011 11:45 pm
Location: Paisley, Scotland

Translations of the musical movie

Postby Trompe-la-Mort » Fri Mar 08, 2013 2:19 pm

Some people may know already that I'm rather obsessed with the musical's lyrics in different languages (and the others know now :wink: ). So I was expecting that the new musical movie would provide me with an opportunity to get my hands on more versions. But it seems that it's become more common to dub musicals by only dubbing the spoken parts and leaving the sung parts in English. That's how the German dub was done and from the list of voice actors, I'd assume that the French dub is similar...

So, my question to all people in non-English speaking countries: Was the movie dubbed into the respective language? And if yes, how? Is there any version in which the entire movie is dubbed?

I thank you already.
Dark sarcasm ought to be taught at schools!

User avatar
Prisoner 24653
Posts: 748
Joined: Tue Jan 10, 2012 6:07 pm

Re: Translations of the musical movie

Postby Prisoner 24653 » Fri Mar 08, 2013 7:20 pm

I'm really curious about this, as well... I had hoped there would at least be a fully dubbed French version. But yes, any info at all about this would be greatly appreciated. :D

a-nom-de-plume
Posts: 32
Joined: Tue Jan 22, 2013 1:17 am

Re: Translations of the musical movie

Postby a-nom-de-plume » Fri Mar 08, 2013 10:00 pm

The movie was only available with subtitles and audio in English in Brazil. I'm not sure if it's something good or bad. Some of the translated lyrics don't go well. "Do You Hear The People Sing" turned into "Listen to Everybody Sing," and "One Day More" turned into "Just One More."
It is of public knowledge that Monsieur l'Inspecteur has the right to pronounce his name dramatically and with added emphasis whenever he sees fit.

Image

User avatar
Trompe-la-Mort
Posts: 599
Joined: Sat Feb 19, 2011 11:45 pm
Location: Paisley, Scotland

Re: Translations of the musical movie

Postby Trompe-la-Mort » Mon Mar 25, 2013 9:24 am

Okay, I saw it in France now and it was entirely in English with French subtitles... Did I just not pay attention and it said "version originale" somewhere (I can't find it, though...) or is that really the only way it is shown in France?
Dark sarcasm ought to be taught at schools!

User avatar
between4walls
Posts: 471
Joined: Wed Apr 13, 2011 8:50 pm
Contact:

Re: Translations of the musical movie

Postby between4walls » Thu Mar 28, 2013 4:04 am

I think that was the only way it was shown in France as I remember some surprise/complaint in the French press at the time. But I can't find the article now.
Here day embraces night, and says: I will die with you and you will be reborn with me. From the heavy embrace of all desolations springs faith.

The real name of devotion is disinterestedness.

User avatar
Auf die Barrikaden
Posts: 730
Joined: Mon May 23, 2011 2:36 pm
Location: In the heart of the city we claim as our own!
Contact:

Re: Translations of the musical movie

Postby Auf die Barrikaden » Sun Apr 21, 2013 10:04 pm

I'm just home from watching Les Mis with German dubbed dialogue. OMG was that awful. Even worse than I thought possible. Inconsistent. Erradicate. Awful awful awful. Thankfully there's not much of that in the movie altogether and it gets less and less the more the movie procedes. Still...whoever came up with the idea of dubbing the dialogue lines is plain nuts.
Resident Les Miz prop expert and collector
Non licet omnibus adire Corinthum
Former Roles: Jesus (Jesus Christ Superstar), Dr Orin Scrivello (Little Shop of Horrors), Ensemble Cameo (Fame)

Ilargi
Posts: 64
Joined: Tue Oct 27, 2015 4:42 pm

Re: Translations of the musical movie

Postby Ilargi » Mon Nov 02, 2015 11:51 am

As a translator, I'm also somewhat obsessed about how the lyrics are adapted in different languages, so I find this topic very interesting and could talk for hours about it. In Spain they dubbed the spoken parts and subtitled the rest. The dubbed parts are very few, so they could have subtitled them as well and that would have favored the credibility, but I think they decided to dub those few lines for commercial reasons, to make people believe there would be more dialogues and less songs. If you watch the Spanish trailer, you may think it's something like Grease, where you have some songs, but there are a lot of spoken parts too, so you don't have to be reading during the whole film. In Spain people are not used to subtitles, so most of them wouldn't pay the ticket knowing the film mostly consists of songs in English. So I guess a lot of them decided to go to the cinema because it's a famous story with famous actors, and then felt disappointed or even deceived.
The Spanish translator, Quico Rovira-Beleta, says he wrote the subtitles so they would rhyme and have the same metrics as the original lyrics, so people would be able to sing along, therefore he gave priority to the form over the meaning. Anyway, all the subtitles can't be sung, because a lot of them are longer than they should, but when you read them you have some sense of rhythm and even if it doesn't always fit with the music you're hearing, you can believe you're actually reading music instead of prose. However, the translation sometimes sacrifices the consistence of the lyrics. For example, in Red and black, the blood of angry men is translated as "la sangre del luchador" (the blood of the fighter), and in Do you hear the people sing, the song of angry men is translated as "la canción del que va a luchar" (the song of the one who's going to fight"). You always have to make a choice when you translate, and here the translator went for the rhythm and the rhyme rather than for the literal meaning. In my opinion, the result is not bad, but if you can speak English or are familiarized with the original lyrics it's a little bit strange and you notice it.
If you are very interested in the Spanish translation of the songs in the film, I recommend you this essay (in Spanish), where the author analyses and compares the lyrics song by song.


Return to “Movies”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 20 guests

cron