The Numbers Game: Who Am I? In other languages

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torontocolm
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The Numbers Game: Who Am I? In other languages

Postby torontocolm » Fri Mar 22, 2013 11:02 pm

In the USA and England (or any English speaking country for that matter), we know Jean Valjean as Prisoner 24601. What would "Who Am I?" be without the iconic 2-4-6-0-11111111111111111 at the end?

However, in Spanish- we are introduced to Prisoner 23623, and 2-4-6-0-1 is replaced with a resounding Dos-Tres-Seis-Dos-Tresssssssssssssss

For those of you who have seen/heard the show in other languages, what other numbers does Jean Valjean go by as a prisoner?

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macaron
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Re: The Numbers Game: Who Am I? In other languages

Postby macaron » Fri Mar 22, 2013 11:13 pm

In Sweden, at least in the most recent production, we had 2-5-6-0-1, I believe. "Två-fem-sex-noll-ett".

Obviously changing the number to fit the music makes sense, but I found it very jarring since I wasn't prepared for it. *g*

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Re: The Numbers Game: Who Am I? In other languages

Postby Acaila » Fri Mar 22, 2013 11:27 pm

What is four in Swedish that it wouldn't fit? :)
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macaron
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Re: The Numbers Game: Who Am I? In other languages

Postby macaron » Fri Mar 22, 2013 11:33 pm

"Fyra", sort of pronounced like "fihra", maybe? Two syllables, in any case, so doesn't really work. Although technically you could shorten it to "fyr", but I guess they thought that sounded to old-fashioned. :P

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Re: The Numbers Game: Who Am I? In other languages

Postby Rachelle » Sat Mar 23, 2013 12:18 am

The first time I heard the spanish version I had to pause it and listen to it again to make sure I heard it right. It makes sense though.
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Re: The Numbers Game: Who Am I? In other languages

Postby Lamarque-is-Dead » Sat Mar 23, 2013 12:31 am

Yeah, I guess Dos-Cuatro-Seis-Cero-Uno wouldn't quite fit. :P
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Re: The Numbers Game: Who Am I? In other languages

Postby YoungStudentMarius » Sat Mar 23, 2013 12:42 am

It's the same number in French, I believe, but I've always found it interesting how it's pronounced differently, as "twenty-four-six-hundred-one," I think. I suppose I hadn't thought about all the variations on simply speaking the same number before that, and how the one we have in English really is a very iconic and singular interpretation of a number. I mean, "Twenty-four thousand, six hundred and one," has a very different effect, if you think about it. I like this thread. :D
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Re: The Numbers Game: Who Am I? In other languages

Postby a-nom-de-plume » Sat Mar 23, 2013 1:24 am

In the Brazilian production, his number is 23612 - "dois-três-seis-um-dois."

The number 24601 would kill the metric, I think, because it would be either "dois-quatro-seis-zero-um" or "dois-quatro-meia-zero-um."
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Prisoner 24653
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Re: The Numbers Game: Who Am I? In other languages

Postby Prisoner 24653 » Sat Mar 23, 2013 2:26 am

In Japan, it becomes 24653 (and that's where my username comes from). It fits the rhythm better than if they had tried to keep it as 24601 -- "ni yon roku go san" is 6 syllables, whereas "ni yon roku zero ichi" would be 8 syllables and would probably sound awkward when sung.

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Re: The Numbers Game: Who Am I? In other languages

Postby Trompe-la-Mort » Sun Mar 24, 2013 11:24 pm

Valjean gets four Spanish prison numbers:
-Madrid, 1993: Dos-cuatro-seis-cero-uno. Yep, despite the fact that it doesn't fit...
-Buenos Aires, 2000: Dos-cuatro-seis-cero-dos (24602). Better...
-Ciudad de Mexico, 2002: Dos-tres-seis-tres-dos (23632)
-Madrid, 2010: The aforementioned 23623

Apart from that...
More 24601s:
-German: Zwei-vier-sechs-null-eins
-Dutch: Twee-vier-zes-null-één
-Hungarian: Huszon-negy hat null egy (twenty-four six zero one)
-Hebrew: שתיים ארבע ששמאות אחד (shtaim-arba-shesh-me'ot-ekhad; twenty-four six hundred one and yes, far too long)
-At least one Norwegian libretto: To-fire-seks-null-éin
-Danish: To-fire-seks-noll-ett
-Icelandic: Tveir-fjór-sex-núll-einn
-Basque: Bi-lau-sei-zero-bat
-Catalan: Dos-quatre-sis-zero-un
-Polish, 2010: Dwa-cztery-sześć-zero-jeden
-And possibly Korean (1993 translation): i-sa-yuk-gong-ha(n). I don't actually know any Korean, but the first four seem to fit. The fifth number sounds like "ha" and a short form of "one" appears to be "han", so I just assume I missed that 'n'...

Other numbers:
-Czech: Tři-pět-šestsetdva (three five six hundred two)
-Most Norwegian lyrics: To-fem-seks-null-éin (25601)
-Finnish: Kuus-kuus-kahdeksan (668, thanks Starlene)
-Polish, Gdynia version: Might be Dwa-cztery-pięć-null-dwa (24502) I'm absolutely not certain, especially not about that second number...
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Re: The Numbers Game: Who Am I? In other languages

Postby Acaila » Mon Mar 25, 2013 12:23 am

Awesome post! :D I'm very impressed with your linguistic skills :wink:
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Re: The Numbers Game: Who Am I? In other languages

Postby Trompe-la-Mort » Mon Mar 25, 2013 9:18 am

Thanks...

@a-nom-de-plume: I completely forgot to ask. How come you have two words for six in Portuguese? Where does "meia" come from?
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Re: The Numbers Game: Who Am I? In other languages

Postby Courgette » Thu Mar 28, 2013 6:59 pm

The moment I read the topic of this thread, I was instantly reminded of Vikidal Gyula's epic '24601!' :lol: I've read a joke somewhere that Prisoners 24600 and 24602 would be feeling extremely neglected because of Valjean!!

And the first time I heard the 25th Anniversary Madrid cast, I was like,"Why has the Prisoner number been changed???" Although my Spanish knowledge is next to nothing, I can count up to 10 in Spanish, and I was like,"Dos-Tres...what?!?" :shock: But it's interesting to know that there is NO hard & fast rule about the Prisoner number in other languages.

In English (at least), how does "Two-Four-Six-Zero-One' sound to you??
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Re: The Numbers Game: Who Am I? In other languages

Postby a-nom-de-plume » Fri Mar 29, 2013 7:03 am

@Trompe-la-Mort: A quick Google search says that the origin probably came from the bad quality of phone calls, in the beginning of the 20th century. It was common for people to mistake "três" for "seis" because of the similar sound, so, they adopted "meia" in place of "seis," coming from "meia dúzia" - half a dozen. "Seis" is used for counting things while "meia" is used for numbers in general.
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Re: The Numbers Game: Who Am I? In other languages

Postby Trompe-la-Mort » Tue Apr 02, 2013 2:27 pm

@a-nom-de-plume: That is amazing... Thanks a lot!
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