New Tumblr: Enjolraic

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Col.Despard
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New Tumblr: Enjolraic

Postby Col.Despard » Thu Mar 24, 2011 3:31 am

Have started a new tumblr (other than my flapper/1920s one!) to pull together visual sources for Les Misérables and associated art. Fashions, things that amuse me, art...that sort of thing.

Found a cartoon featuring Louis-Philippe and a couple of the dead of 1832 in the morgue today - possibly only the members of this board would appreciate just why that made me so happy (at last! a visual!).

http://debonaircourfeyrac.tumblr.com/
"The principles of freedom, of humanity, and of justice, will finally triumph over falsehood, tyranny and delusion, and every principle inimical to the interests of the human race" - Edward Despard, 1803
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Usefulbeauty
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Re: New Tumblr: Enjolraic

Postby Usefulbeauty » Thu Mar 24, 2011 4:33 am

Ooh, brilliant! :) I'm especially enjoying the fashion pictures. The savate ones are amazing as well. I know almost nothing about martial arts but oooh, would I like to see a fellow in a waistcoat doing that.
Let us read and let us dance--two amusements that will never do any harm to the world.
- Voltaire

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Ravariel
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Re: New Tumblr: Enjolraic

Postby Ravariel » Thu Mar 24, 2011 5:59 am

Enjoying the morgue pictures. It would sound better to say I'm appreciating them, but that's not right; I'm enjoying them. Morbidly.

A question: were unclaimed bodies from Paris morgues used for medical dissections? Because it popped into my head how horrible and somehow fitting it would be were, say, Joly and Combeferre's bodies used for dissection.

.....hopefully not in the classrooms they used to attend....

Yeah. Morbid.
"I learned not to fear infinity,
The far field, the windy cliffs of forever,
The dying of time in the white light of tomorrow."
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Aurelia Combeferre
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Re: New Tumblr: Enjolraic

Postby Aurelia Combeferre » Fri Mar 25, 2011 4:20 am

I love this site. :D Great work on it---my favorites have to be the combat pictures. :D
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Citizeness Feuilly
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Re: New Tumblr: Enjolraic

Postby Citizeness Feuilly » Fri Mar 25, 2011 6:11 pm

I was wondering who was responsible for that lovely new blog...my money was on either you or Marianne. :) I adore tumblr, but there's so little serious Les Misérables scholarship on there, though - it's mainly all musical. So I'm thrilled that there's a blog like this at last!

Excellent posts, by the way...morbid though it is, I love those pictures of the morgue. The pictures make it so much easier to imagine Les Amis all lined up together, waiting for someone to claim their bodies.

I second Ravariel's question - if a body went unclaimed, would it be used for dissection? And also, was there a time limit on how long relatives had to come forward? And, if so, would they have had to prove they were blood relatives? So, for example - would Musichetta have been allowed to claim either one of Joly or Bousset's bodies? Or would she not have been able to, because she was just their mistress?

And I'll just say here, Despard, that your 1920s/flapper blog is fantastic too!

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MmeBahorel
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Re: New Tumblr: Enjolraic

Postby MmeBahorel » Sat Mar 26, 2011 12:30 am

Summer + Cholera + random holes from bullets and bayonets = not getting useful bodies if there's any time for family to identify and claim them

Dissections are on hiatus at this period, anyway, because summer makes it impossible to keep the bodies. Winter session ran 1 November to 31 March, and dissections were performed only during winter session.
What kind of literature and what kind of life is the same question. - Tom Stoppard

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Col.Despard
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Re: New Tumblr: Enjolraic

Postby Col.Despard » Sat Mar 26, 2011 4:04 am

Glad you're all enjoying it :) I'm a heavily visual person, so it helps to have somewhere for me to pile on images...I've been leaving them all over every computer to which I have access (I just found a whole cache I'd stashed on my friend's computer). It forms a sort of mental collage, particularly when suplemented by written sources, to explore the Paris of the day...I'm glad you think it's on the scholarly side, Citiziness Feuilly, but I think it would be much more academically respectable and probably a whole helluva lot funnier if someone like Marianne or MmeBahorel was doing it...I just tend to go "SHINY" and that's enough. Or "WANT PALAIS-ROYAL PICTURE NOW!" Or the Morgue, as the case may be.

The anatomy/dissection question is an interesting one...I was thinking about it the other day because I'd come across an account of the Parkman-Webster-Littlefield 1849 case at Harvard and suggestions that a new book to be released in the next year or so will go more into Littlefield's role in obtaining corpses for dissection and how it might have a bearing on the murder case. This of course sent me "haring" (pardon the Courfeyracian dreadfullness of the pun) after Burke and Hare online, and wondering whether any similar scandals might have affected the legislation regarding obtaining corpses for dissection in other countries like France and hey, just what were those practices anyway?

Of course, you're spot on about the time of year and other factors, MmeBahorel - I should have thought of those.
"The principles of freedom, of humanity, and of justice, will finally triumph over falsehood, tyranny and delusion, and every principle inimical to the interests of the human race" - Edward Despard, 1803

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Ravariel
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Re: New Tumblr: Enjolraic

Postby Ravariel » Sat Mar 26, 2011 5:31 am

Mme. Bahorel: thank you for a rational excuse not to think about the amis on dissection tables. :| Once my brain hits on an idea, especially a gross/morbid one, it tends to keep bringing that idea back up until I have a reason to forbid it...

But it still may take me a while to banish the picture of young med students wondering why someone isn't in class today and then finding him on the dissection table *shudder*


Enough of that. I love the hats, by the way :D
"I learned not to fear infinity,
The far field, the windy cliffs of forever,
The dying of time in the white light of tomorrow."
--Theodore Roethke

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Col.Despard
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Re: New Tumblr: Enjolraic

Postby Col.Despard » Sat Mar 26, 2011 6:46 am

Courfeyrac hats! Now that the (canonically based) fanon trope about Courfeyrac being very hat-centric is established, I'm going to go after hats at every opportunity. Particularly as I adore them so much myself, and have my own silk collapisble opera hats and uncountable Victorian through to 30s hats myself. I understand Courfeyrac...I really, really do!

You're probably familiar with the Burke and Hare case, Ravariel, and how it was rumoured that some of Dr Robert Knox's recognised one of their victims, Mary Patterson, on the dissecting table because she was a prostitute whose services they'd used.
"The principles of freedom, of humanity, and of justice, will finally triumph over falsehood, tyranny and delusion, and every principle inimical to the interests of the human race" - Edward Despard, 1803

http://coloneldespard.deviantart.com/

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Ravariel
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Re: New Tumblr: Enjolraic

Postby Ravariel » Sat Mar 26, 2011 6:51 am

Nope, not familiar with it, actually. If the thought won't leave me alone I may end up looking into it a little :?

I adore hats. I don't really own any, but I adore them.
"I learned not to fear infinity,
The far field, the windy cliffs of forever,
The dying of time in the white light of tomorrow."
--Theodore Roethke

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Col.Despard
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Re: New Tumblr: Enjolraic

Postby Col.Despard » Sat Mar 26, 2011 7:22 am

I forget that not everyone is as gruesomely morbid as I am! I cut my teeth on historical cases like Burke and Hare, Mary Ann Cotton, Jack the Ripper, Dr Crippen...I still dive into them occasionally. The classics! I have no interest in contemporary true crime, but I'm fascinated by historical criminal cases...I love puzzles and social history.
"The principles of freedom, of humanity, and of justice, will finally triumph over falsehood, tyranny and delusion, and every principle inimical to the interests of the human race" - Edward Despard, 1803

http://coloneldespard.deviantart.com/

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MmeBahorel
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Re: New Tumblr: Enjolraic

Postby MmeBahorel » Sat Mar 26, 2011 3:00 pm

You don't have the grave stealing in France because the legislation gives the medical school first crack at all bodies from the hospitals who have no family or whose family cannot afford burial. This includes the insane asylums and old-folks hospices. This creates a ready, constant (though not consistent) supply of working class men, women, and children. Bodies not wanted for dissection, or that died of infectious disease, get the paupers' burial. (What I don't know is how dissected remains are disposed of - do you send them to the bone man?)

Paris had an excellent, very easy supply of bodies compared to London (and probably the Scottish schools). Your dissecting fee pretty much worked out to two bodies each month of the dissecting season, shared between about 5 people, and all that for only about 20 francs. Sometimes you could get that down to four; sometimes there were shortages and you either increased the size of the groups or some people had to go without.

This is all from the Med school article of awesome: Medical Students in England and France, 1815-1858, A Comparative Study, by Florent Pallault. (PDF, and yes, in English.) I have downloaded this for quick and easy access because it is brilliant on issues like this.
What kind of literature and what kind of life is the same question. - Tom Stoppard

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Col.Despard
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Re: New Tumblr: Enjolraic

Postby Col.Despard » Sat Mar 26, 2011 10:32 pm

That's fascinating, MmeBahorel - I wonder when they instituted those legislative changes, and what prompted them? All I'd been able to find on the cursory google I'd done was earlier stuff - references to Resurrection Men in Paris being called Les Corbeaux, and Andreas Vesalius and his fellow students robbing Parisian graveyards way back in the 1530s for dissection subjects. The Burke and Hare case prompted the 1832 Anatomy act reforms which regulated and enabled access to corpses in the UK much like what you're describing in France. Interesting that Quebec didn't pass any similar regulation until 1875, and again it was prompted by scandal.

It's easy to see why such an issue is problematic and we still have variations on it today with the questions over procuring organs and a market in illegal tissue. I was shocked to catch a doco on TV about a case in America where a funeral parlour owner was faking permissions from family members to use tissues from the bodies entrusted to his care for medical use, with terrible consequences. Not only had the tissue frequently been prepared/preserved incorrectly before they extracted it, some of the dead from which they were taking the tissue had died from diseases, and the recipients suffered medical complications...a modern day twist on the Resurrection Men.

As much as I recognise the need to secure a steady supply of cadavers for research (essential to the advancement of medicine), the social justice advocate in me is grieved that some of the most disempowered in society who were used for this purpose. Personally, I don't give a hoot what happens to my body after death - I've already authorsed organ donation. But for these individuals, whether one agrees with their beliefs or not, the idea of being dismembered after death would be complete anathema.
"The principles of freedom, of humanity, and of justice, will finally triumph over falsehood, tyranny and delusion, and every principle inimical to the interests of the human race" - Edward Despard, 1803

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MmeBahorel
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Re: New Tumblr: Enjolraic

Postby MmeBahorel » Sat Mar 26, 2011 11:59 pm

1798. When the post-revolutionary curriculum was created in 1794, the importance of practical anatomy was noted, and the Ecole pratique de dissection was revived. An ordinance of 1798 directed all unclaimed bodies from the hospitals and hospices there. Private anatomical theatres existed until 1813, when the government ordered all of them closed (some of them had obtained corpses through grave robbing, since all the decent corpses were being fed from the hospitals to the Ecole pratique.) Med students in our period used either the dissecting rooms at the hôpital Pitié or the Ecole pratique.
What kind of literature and what kind of life is the same question. - Tom Stoppard

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Col.Despard
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Re: New Tumblr: Enjolraic

Postby Col.Despard » Sun Mar 27, 2011 12:01 am

Brilliant! And indicative of why Paris was seen as being at the forefront of medicine in this period, with practical support like that.
"The principles of freedom, of humanity, and of justice, will finally triumph over falsehood, tyranny and delusion, and every principle inimical to the interests of the human race" - Edward Despard, 1803

http://coloneldespard.deviantart.com/


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