Hello from Spain!

Introduce yourself to the rest of us!
Ilargi
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Hello from Spain!

Postby Ilargi » Tue Oct 27, 2015 5:05 pm

Hi!
I'm Ilargi from Spain. I've been a "Les Misérables" fan for a while and I've decided to join this forum because my friends don't share my passion (actually, they aren't interested in it at all) and I need someone to discuss the story with.
I first learned about "Les Misérables" in Summer 2013, when I watched the 2012 film on a plane during a flight to the United States. I remember thinking it was good enough, but not being too enthusiastic about it, I guess it was because the sound and image quality wasn't ideal. In Summer 2014, the musical came to Spain and I decided to go watch it in my town. I totally loved it, to the point that I dressed up as Éponine for Carnival (when no-one around me understood who I was even though I strove to explain it). I was curious about the book, but, although I love reading, I didn't feel motivated enough to read almost 2000 pages of 19th century prose. But I finally did it some weeks ago (and in French, not any translation, because I'm a little masochistic and I told myself, "in for a penny, in for a pound!") and I became obsessed about this story and everything that has to do with it. Now I'm planning a trip to London to watch the musical there, probably at Easter next year.
I'm looking forward to knowing more fans like me and to sharing opinions with you! :D

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Prisoner 24653
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Re: Hello from Spain!

Postby Prisoner 24653 » Thu Oct 29, 2015 8:42 am

Welcome, Ilargi! I'm James. It's great to meet you! And not to worry; there are plenty here who can share your passion for the story. :mrgreen:

Ilargi
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Re: Hello from Spain!

Postby Ilargi » Fri Oct 30, 2015 1:46 pm

Thank you, James! Nice to meet you too! :D

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Auf die Barrikaden
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Re: Hello from Spain!

Postby Auf die Barrikaden » Sat Oct 31, 2015 11:28 am

Hola! :) Welcome to the board!
Resident Les Miz prop expert and collector
Non licet omnibus adire Corinthum
Former Roles: Jesus (Jesus Christ Superstar), Dr Orin Scrivello (Little Shop of Horrors), Ensemble Cameo (Fame)

Ilargi
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Re: Hello from Spain!

Postby Ilargi » Sat Oct 31, 2015 5:10 pm

Thanks! :D

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Chantefleurie
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Re: Hello from Spain!

Postby Chantefleurie » Sun Nov 08, 2015 8:10 pm

Welcome, Ilargi! I had a very similar story to yours - I was almost accidentally introduced to the musical/movie, watched the 2012 movie, then read the book and watched more musicals... But I wasn't brave enough to tackle the Brick in French. ;) I've read a few of my favourite passages in the original, but not more than that.

If I could go back, though, I would make myself read the book before I've seen the musical/movie. :)
C'est tellement mystérieux, le pays des larmes. ~Le Petit Prince, Antoine de Saint-Exupéry

Ilargi
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Re: Hello from Spain!

Postby Ilargi » Mon Nov 09, 2015 4:53 pm

Hi, Chantefleurie! I was actually afraid to read it in French, but I wanted to see how the original story was written and I decided to give it a try. Anyway, I read it pretty fast (I mean, it took me almost two months, but anyway I feel that I went very fast through some passages, because I was so thrilled I wanted to go on as quickly as possible), so now I've found a Spanish translation I know I can trust, I'm going to reread it more calmly.

Chantefleurie wrote:If I could go back, though, I would make myself read the book before I've seen the musical/movie.

I usually prefer reading books before I watch their adaptations, but in this case I don't regret it, because I don't think I missed that "first time feeling" you experience when you don't know the story. In fact, the brick impressed me deeply, it had the ability stirred something inside of me even though I knew beforehand what was going to happen next. When it comes to other stories, you don't have the same feeling if you have already watched the film, but Les Mis had an impact on me even so, that's why I like it so much. :D

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Chantefleurie
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Re: Hello from Spain!

Postby Chantefleurie » Mon Nov 09, 2015 10:00 pm

Ilargi wrote:Hi, Chantefleurie! I was actually afraid to read it in French, but I wanted to see how the original story was written and I decided to give it a try. Anyway, I read it pretty fast (I mean, it took me almost two months, but anyway I feel that I went very fast through some passages, because I was so thrilled I wanted to go on as quickly as possible), so now I've found a Spanish translation I know I can trust, I'm going to reread it more calmly.


Heheheh... I took my time reading it... In fact I took about 9 months reading it... :D (But to be fair, the entire last 1/3 of the novel was read in two weeks). And I reread at least half of it in about a month. I noticed that I would read very slowly when I came those spots where nothing really happens but which are important for setting the background, then gulp the exciting part in one or two days, and then stall again until the momentum of the book picked up.

But anyways, hats off to you for tackling it in French! The most I dared read in that language is Le Petit Prince and Oscar et la Dame Rose, which are both significantly shorter and simpler than Les Mis.

Ilargi wrote:
Chantefleurie wrote:If I could go back, though, I would make myself read the book before I've seen the musical/movie.

I usually prefer reading books before I watch their adaptations, but in this case I don't regret it, because I don't think I missed that "first time feeling" you experience when you don't know the story. In fact, the brick impressed me deeply, it had the ability stirred something inside of me even though I knew beforehand what was going to happen next. When it comes to other stories, you don't have the same feeling if you have already watched the film, but Les Mis had an impact on me even so, that's why I like it so much. :D


I found that I still had that "first time feeling" for all of Les Amis stuff, which is basically glossed over in the musical, and for the Valjean-Marius-Cosette ending triangle relationship. I was much more impressed with Myriel. But I found that the movie/musical has ruined a lot of things for me as well. Like Gavroche's death. I feel like a reader who doesn't know what's coming would be like the people at the barricade - holding their breath and hoping that Gavroche's luck will endure. But when I got to that part, it just didn't happen. I sort of accepted in advance that he's going to be shot.

But I certainly agree with you that Hugo has a talent in stirring feelings and hope and hate even though you know what's coming. But I noticed that more with Notre Dame than with Les Mis.
C'est tellement mystérieux, le pays des larmes. ~Le Petit Prince, Antoine de Saint-Exupéry

Ilargi
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Re: Hello from Spain!

Postby Ilargi » Tue Nov 10, 2015 8:41 am

Chantefleurie wrote:But I found that the movie/musical has ruined a lot of things for me as well. Like Gavroche's death. I feel like a reader who doesn't know what's coming would be like the people at the barricade - holding their breath and hoping that Gavroche's luck will endure. But when I got to that part, it just didn't happen. I sort of accepted in advance that he's going to be shot.

It's true that I knew Gavroche was going to die, so it didn't surprise me, but his fate was so sad, so unfair, that as I was approaching that moment I thought: "No, it can't be, it can't be". So the people at the barricade was hoping for him to come out alive because there was a slight chance he might, but I was hoping because I didn't want to believe what I knew.
It was even harder with Les Amis. In the movie/musical, they were only a group of students and they all looked alike to me, I couldn't tell them apart (except for Enjolras, who always stands out, but I wasn't specially fond of him back then), so when they all die, I was like, OK, so all of them fall, more corpses on the ground, no problem, everyone is dying here, so who cares? But when I read the brick I realized every one of them had a name, a personality, a backstory... They became real to me. And I spent the whole barricade part thinking: "Oh, no, no, they're going to die, they're going to die, why, why, WHY? They can't die!". So yes, I knew the story beforehand, but the brick somehow made it so real that I didn't want to believe it.

Chantefleurie wrote:But I noticed that more with Notre Dame than with Les Mis.

I read Notre Dame (in Spanish) many years ago, as a teenager, and it didn't make such a strong impression in me (even though I found the end moving). But I do remember reading some paragraphs twice or three times because they were so beautifully written! I definitely have to read it again from an adult's perspective and I'm sure I'm going to discover a lot of things that will change my concept of the book. I'll let you know. :wink:

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Chantefleurie
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Re: Hello from Spain!

Postby Chantefleurie » Tue Nov 10, 2015 9:19 pm

Ilargi wrote:It was even harder with Les Amis. In the movie/musical, they were only a group of students and they all looked alike to me, I couldn't tell them apart (except for Enjolras, who always stands out, but I wasn't specially fond of him back then), so when they all die, I was like, OK, so all of them fall, more corpses on the ground, no problem, everyone is dying here, so who cares? But when I read the brick I realized every one of them had a name, a personality, a backstory... They became real to me. And I spent the whole barricade part thinking: "Oh, no, no, they're going to die, they're going to die, why, why, WHY? They can't die!". So yes, I knew the story beforehand, but the brick somehow made it so real that I didn't want to believe it.


I could not agree more. In the musical, yes, it's sad that everyone dies, but they are just strangers to you. I didn't even know Enjolras's name until I got to that part in the Brick. But in the book, even though most of les Amis die much less dramatically - almost all in one sentence - each new name is like a knife in you. I knew they were going to die, but it hurt just as much. And I still found myself reading that sentence and being shocked at each new name, and hoping that more names wouldn't follow. That one sentence caused me more emotional pain than the whole musical put together.

But it didn't happen for Gavroche. Perhaps I just had really high expectations for that scene and was waiting for it too attentively. If I for a second forgot how it ends, I'm sure I would have been drawn in as well. But because I was anticipating it, I suppose I ruined it for myself.

Ilargi wrote:
Chantefleurie wrote:But I noticed that more with Notre Dame than with Les Mis.

I read Notre Dame (in Spanish) many years ago, as a teenager, and it didn't make such a strong impression in me (even though I found the end moving). But I do remember reading some paragraphs twice or three times because they were so beautifully written! I definitely have to read it again from an adult's perspective and I'm sure I'm going to discover a lot of things that will change my concept of the book. I'll let you know. :wink:


I feel like the entire first half of Notre Dame is an introduction, but the entire second half is so heavy with emotion that it took me a few weeks to recover from that book. I won't be too specific, in case you decide to reread ;), but I'm surprised at how different - and how much better - it was when I read it as a 16-17 year old (first time I read it I was 8-9). I remembered most of the plot, but my perception of most characters changed so dramatically. And there was one specific moment where as a kid I remember thinking "Good for you that you said no!", and as a teen I was thinking "Say yes... Please say yes... You must say yes... How could you say no?!! How can you not have enough heart to say no?" I knew how the character would respond, but the intensity was so strong that I hoped against my better knowledge that things can still go differently, and I really believed for a second that the character will respond differently, and when I read the refusal I was shocked and disappointed and emotionally beaten up. And only after than I realized that I've known how it would turn out, so I shouldn't have been that surprised. But that's the beauty of that book. It takes you in and makes you forget everything else.

If you ever do a reread please do tell me, and we can compare impressions! :)
C'est tellement mystérieux, le pays des larmes. ~Le Petit Prince, Antoine de Saint-Exupéry

Ilargi
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Re: Hello from Spain!

Postby Ilargi » Wed Nov 11, 2015 9:32 am

Chantefleurie wrote:If you ever do a reread please do tell me, and we can compare impressions! :)

You can count on it! I love to discuss books! :D

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23623
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Re: Hello from Spain!

Postby 23623 » Sun Jan 17, 2016 9:24 am

I suddenly realize that I haven't left anything in the introduction thread of the first person who spoke to me in this forum :D According to the board today is your birthday though I don't know it's referring to your time zone or mine. ¡Feliz cumpleaños Ilargi!
Revolution, but civilization

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Chantefleurie
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Re: Hello from Spain!

Postby Chantefleurie » Sun Jan 17, 2016 10:21 pm

_23623_ wrote:I suddenly realize that I haven't left anything in the introduction thread of the first person who spoke to me in this forum :D According to the board today is your birthday though I don't know it's referring to your time zone or mine. ¡Feliz cumpleaños Ilargi!


Whoah, good thing I logged on today. Seconded happy birthday to the lovely Ilargi!
C'est tellement mystérieux, le pays des larmes. ~Le Petit Prince, Antoine de Saint-Exupéry

Ilargi
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Re: Hello from Spain!

Postby Ilargi » Thu Jan 21, 2016 11:49 am

Thank you!!! :D


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