Meta: Writing Enjolras, especially slash and romance

Meta related to characters, plots, or other elements introduced by Victor Hugo in Les Misérables.
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MmeBahorel
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Re: Meta: Writing Enjolras, especially slash and romance

Postby MmeBahorel » Sun Feb 13, 2011 7:35 pm

The "Shakespeare Season" was at the Odeon, actually - See Dumas' memoirs, page 163 of this volume. William Macready as Othello, Harriet Smithson as Ophelia and Juliet, and Charles Kemble as Hamlet and Romeo. Three nights only, in September 1827.

For research, start poking around Nerdy Fannish Research here on the boards - we've linked to a lot of things, from maps to newspapers to excellent secondary sources available online. (Thank you, Google Books.) The maps in particular will give you a better sense of Paris geography, and I think I've linked some travel guides - Galignani are some of my best friends.
What kind of literature and what kind of life is the same question. - Tom Stoppard

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sb_soprano
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Re: Meta: Writing Enjolras, especially slash and romance

Postby sb_soprano » Mon Feb 14, 2011 1:15 am

Marianne wrote:Bear in mind that the Odéon is on the Left Bank, a good distance away from the site of the 1832 barricade. It's conceivable that it would be commandeered by students, being in the Latin Quarter, but our boys are on the other side of the river and the whole point of urban-warfare-by-barricades is to prevent easy movement within the city.

Also, MmeBahorel is free to correct me on this, but I have a hunch that the Shakespeare troupe wouldn't have been playing in the Odéon--Shakespeare was radical and different and Romantic in France at the time, and the Odéon was a bastion of conservative classicism.

For more on life in the theatres and on the fringes in that time period, I highly recommend watching Les Enfants du Paradis, which aside from being good for historical background is an incredible movie--one of the greatest classics of French cinema. And for the harsh realities of life as an actress, check out Balzac's Lost Illusions. It was not an honorable profession, and success on the stage often depended on being "kept" by a rich protector. A poor girl would not go into acting if she wanted to keep her dignity and reputation--far more likely that she was seduced and abandoned, or otherwise had sex outside of wedlock, and took to the stage because it was more glamorous and exciting than the life of a common whore.


Thanks for the references! Netflix doesn't have them (stupid Netflix) but I'll dig around the internet for them. Or I'll probably find them on amazon.com. Hopefully. :) And I didn't really imagine that she was an innocent- she probably was poor, and had to resort to prostitution for a while. Like you said, stage life was glamorous, and she accepted the fact that she had to resort to sex in order to be kept on every so often.

I was mostly just thinking of it as a place of work for her, as well as a place that the boys contemplate for a strong hold, but decide not to for that exact reason. However, it is a place where Enjolras and Jacqueline could meet feasibly.


MmeBahorel wrote:The "Shakespeare Season" was at the Odeon, actually - See Dumas' memoirs, page 163 of this volume. William Macready as Othello, Harriet Smithson as Ophelia and Juliet, and Charles Kemble as Hamlet and Romeo. Three nights only, in September 1827.

For research, start poking around Nerdy Fannish Research here on the boards - we've linked to a lot of things, from maps to newspapers to excellent secondary sources available online. (Thank you, Google Books.) The maps in particular will give you a better sense of Paris geography, and I think I've linked some travel guides - Galignani are some of my best friends.


I'll poke through, definitely! Google Books are awesome, no? What would we do without them?

So, MmeBahorel, do you think that's a bit more feasible of a character: having a poor girl who has gone into stage because she's good at it, and knows the costs of the job. She meets the Les Amis when A) they're dragged to a show and/or B) they're perusing the area, deciding if it would be a good strong hold for weaponry/ammunition/medical supplies.
"My only regret is that I have but one life to give for my country."- Nathan Hale
"This is a revolution- we're got to offend somebody!" -Mr. Adams, '1776'
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Marianne
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Re: Meta: Writing Enjolras, especially slash and romance

Postby Marianne » Mon Feb 14, 2011 2:24 am

I'm certain I watched Les Enfants du Paradis on Netflix--try searching under Children of Paradise. As for Lost Illusions, it's a novel, not a movie. There might be a public-domain translation available online, and if not, Barnes & Noble has an inexpensive edition.
[Dieu] entend ta voix, ô fille des hommes! aussi bien que celle des constellations; car rien n'est petit pour celui devant lequel rien n'est grand.
- George Sand, Les sept cordes de la lyre

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sb_soprano
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Re: Meta: Writing Enjolras, especially slash and romance

Postby sb_soprano » Mon Feb 14, 2011 4:00 am

It came up when I searched under the English title, of course. Silly Netflix.

Haha! No wonder it didn't come up- it's a novel, as you said. I'll look through the internet and see what I can find of it. Thanks! 8)
"My only regret is that I have but one life to give for my country."- Nathan Hale
"This is a revolution- we're got to offend somebody!" -Mr. Adams, '1776'
Icon by Hannah.


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