~fashion~~~

Any research done in relation to the period of Les Misérables, whether for fanfiction or fanart purposes or otherwise.
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hazellwood
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Re: ~fashion~~~

Postby hazellwood » Tue Nov 23, 2010 5:48 am

Um, it really depends? They would live on my wall if I had frames, but now I just store them on my bookshelf in the plastic and gaze at them dreamily when I am bored. They do look splendid on walls, though. :3

I was Googling something and came across this site. I don't think it's been linked earlier in the thread.

Usefulbeauty
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Re: ~fashion~~~

Postby Usefulbeauty » Wed Nov 24, 2010 2:21 am

I'd love to get a bunch and dress up my walls with them, but I'd be a bit hard pressed to find enough frames, too.

Did I tell you guys I went to a homeschooling learning fair not long ago? (They described it as "sort of like a science fair but with other subjects than science, too,") I was technically a grade older than the thing was for, but they said that they didn't have many exibits because it's early in the year yet so not many people have great big studies completed. Anyway, I displayed my 1830's underwear and I got to chat with a lady who had majored in textile history. It was also fun to type up my information on the styles of the time, which basically was "SLEEVES HAIR EXTRAVAGANCE all a reaction against the simple styles of the Regency ALSO MEN WORE CORSETS."
Let us read and let us dance--two amusements that will never do any harm to the world.
- Voltaire

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Col.Despard
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Re: ~fashion~~~

Postby Col.Despard » Fri Nov 26, 2010 4:00 am

Having one of those moments...

Just looking at this photo of Robert Cornelius, in the first known photo taken in North America:

http://www.georgianlondon.com/in-the-ey ... th-century

1839...a mere 7 years after the Barricades. The sense of connection in looking at a man in a photo so far removed from us in time is extraordinary. The blogger's comments are spot on.
"The principles of freedom, of humanity, and of justice, will finally triumph over falsehood, tyranny and delusion, and every principle inimical to the interests of the human race" - Edward Despard, 1803
http://coloneldespard.deviantart.com/

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hazellwood
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Re: ~fashion~~~

Postby hazellwood » Fri Nov 26, 2010 5:19 am

Col.Despard wrote:Having one of those moments...

Just looking at this photo of Robert Cornelius, in the first known photo taken in North America:

http://www.georgianlondon.com/in-the-ey ... th-century

1839...a mere 7 years after the Barricades. The sense of connection in looking at a man in a photo so far removed from us in time is extraordinary. The blogger's comments are spot on.

WOW. That's really interesting. I've never really looked at older photographs, usually when I look at photography it's Edwardian--but that's really cool. It's so real, I definitely agree with the comments the poster made.
Usefulbeauty wrote:It was also fun to type up my information on the styles of the time, which basically was "SLEEVES HAIR EXTRAVAGANCE all a reaction against the simple styles of the Regency ALSO MEN WORE CORSETS."

This is SO. COOL. And very accurate. Would you mind sharing your typed info? I'm just asking because I'm curious, if it's too much work or you don't want to don't even bother. :)

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Re: ~fashion~~~

Postby Usefulbeauty » Fri Nov 26, 2010 5:28 am

No trouble at all! It's right here on my laptop. I tried to keep them quite short because I thought it would be awkward for people to have to stand in front of my booth for ages reading every bit.

Chemise
A chemise was the closest garment to the skin--worn to protect your stays from perspiration and your skin from being pinched by the stay’s laces. Rich and poor alike owned chemises, and would have worn them to bed as well as during the day.

A chemise is very easy to make, but time consuming because of the flat-felled seams. (The seam allowance is folded over and sewn to the inside of the garment to avoid rough edges.)
To make this I used Past Patterns 002.


Stays
Rather than the heavily boned stays you might think of, stays (later known as corsets) from the 1830’s were stiffened with cord. They would also have a busk down the front--a strip of wood about the size of a ruler, to keep the stays straight.


Gauged Petticoat

Before the invention of the hoop in the 1850’s, women would have worn up to six petticoats to obtain the fashionable silhouette.

A petticoat is constructed by sewing two to four panels of fabric together and then gathering, pleating, or gauging the petticoat to a waistband.
This petticoat has been gauged (now known as cartridge pleated). Gauging is a period-correct method in which two rows of running stitches are sewn along the top of the petticoat, drawn up to fit the waistband, and pinned to it. Then each individual pleat is sewn to the waistband.


Corded Petticoat

A corded petticoat was vital for getting the right shape. It is a normal petticoat with cords sewn around the circumference which help hold the skirts out when starched. They were also helpful in keeping numerous petticoats from tangling around your legs.

Originally, petticoats had the cords woven into them, but sandwiching them between another panel of fabric is a good alternative.

On this petticoat the cords go a bit past the knee, but some extant petticoats have shown cords that go all the way up to the hips.


Pocket

Pockets were made up separately from dresses, and then tied around the waist and reached by a slit in the side of the dress. They were usually embroidered. The embroidery done on this pocket was based off an original pattern.


A Bit of History

The silhouette of the early 1800’s is easily recognizable to most people: the simple, empire waist style of dress has been made popular by movie versions of Jane Austen’s books. Most people are also familiar with the hoop skirts of the 1860’s. Much thought isn’t given to the 1830’s until it’s pointed out to you.
It was a period of transition between the skinny shape of the Regency period to the wide skirts of the Civil War. And somewhere along the line, those sleeves happened.
This is known as the Romantic Era in fashion as well as in literature, when the famous English Romantics were publishing poetry and Victor Hugo’s infamous Hernani was causing riots at theaters. The style of writing was extravagant and so was the style of fashion.


Hair

Hairstyles in the Romantic Era are a bit startling. There are only two theories I’ve had on how they did that to their hair: one, all lady’s maids were taught by wizards, or two, they cheated.
Sadly, the first theory isn’t the true one. “False plaits” would often be used to make the many loops and braids on the back of the head, and “hair rats” would help to get the impossibly high piles of curls on the sides. (Hair rats aren’t quite as terrible as they sound. They’re small pads of hair, collected from your hairbrush, and covered in netting. Ladies would pin them to their heads and cover them with their hair in order to get the proper volume.)
The most popular method of curling hair was with paper curlers--a technique similar to rag curling.


And then I had a few pages printed out of fashion plates, portraits, and extant dresses, for comparison.
Let us read and let us dance--two amusements that will never do any harm to the world.
- Voltaire

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MmeBahorel
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Re: ~fashion~~~

Postby MmeBahorel » Fri Nov 26, 2010 6:34 am

Was poking around Agricole Perdiguier's memoirs and the chapter on language and patois goes on to talk about clothing.

Perdiguier was a joiner, born in 1805 (thus an exact contemporary of our boys), who completed his Tour of France in 1828 and then went back to Paris in 1829-1830 (he was there for the Trois Glorieuses). He ended up being elected to the National Assembly under the Second Republic and served with Hugo, having to go into exile in 1852. His memoirs, written in exile, are one of the classic descriptions of the French worker at this period and one of the best descriptions of the compagnonnage.

I'm translating from this edition on Google Books, page 235-237:

A word on clothing:

In Provence, Languedoc, Vivarais, Dauphiné, Béarn, Roussillon the round, short jacket was the fashion; in the North, it was the coat, the frock coat, at least on Sundays. I'm not talking about special costumes, which are sometimes original or bizarre, that are worn in some regions.

Compagnons on Sundays are dressed in frock coat or coat. During the week they wear, some a jacket, the greatest number a tailcoat; the blouse never : it did not take form, for workers, until 1830, after the July Revolution.

The blouse, that is so celebrated today, covers the trousers, the jacket, the waistcoat, the shirt of the worker, and it invites, by its form, neglect of all that can't be seen, uncleanliness. The blouse was worn by farmers, carters, not by artisans. I don't think, whatever is said about it, that this article of clothing, nearly always of somber colour, could be favourable to them, in cities above all, and above all when they work in shirtsleeves, that it's no use to them in the workshop, and that it's simply their habitual costume in the street.

See, at the end of the day, principally in the capital, these workers go before their wives, or their partners (? common law wives? [prétendues]), or their mistresses who just ended their work, and the moment after to bring them back, giving them their arms : their heads are covered by a cap, their bodies with the blue blouse on which varnish, glue, oil, other substance have made their imprint; one can only see these two objects of all their clothing, and a little of the bottom of the trousers.

Their companions have only a little white cap, a calico [indienne] dress , a light fichu, several cheap trinkets; and yet they are charming : their aspect pleases the eye makes the heart rejoice. But the men are far from having the same cleanliness, the same elegance.... The couples appear badly matched; one couldn't believe the man and woman are of the same class, of the same condition. Where does this come from? From the blouse, somber blouse, ill-kept blouse, filthy blouse, and which, far from having ennobled the worker, as they sing of it in all tunes, has degraded his physique without elevating his morals.

I don't proscribe the blouse; it is useful to certain professions; but I say that the workers of the cities, in the majorities of industries, are ill served by it; that it makes them a class apart, that it subordinates them, and that often one is far, very far from suspecting what is under it of thought, of sentiment, of generosity, of the good and of the great : I know the impression it makes on certain people, even on people who call themselves our friends, and who are that, perhaps.


Just thought this would be extremely helpful to anyone working on working class characters, particularly Feuilly. (Perdiguier is definitely getting crotchety in his middle age, isn't he, all these young slobs who don't know how to dress or get their laundry done *g*.)

For my translation: redingote = frock coat, habit = coat, veste = jacket, habit-veste = tailcoat (as a search for that terms gets me a bunch of uniforms from the Napoleonic period with square-tailed coats). Blouse, for those who don't know, is the classic working class smock, the "uniform" of the working class in France for most of the nineteenth century. Usually blue, baggy as anything, roughly knee length, and a very distinct marker of class. That apparently somehow infiltrated Paris after 1830 and really annoyed Agricole Perdiguier :)
What kind of literature and what kind of life is the same question. - Tom Stoppard

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Re: ~fashion~~~

Postby Usefulbeauty » Sat Dec 04, 2010 6:59 am

An interesting blog!
http://fashioningbeaubrummell.blogspot.com/
Men's late Regency fashions, huzzah!
Let us read and let us dance--two amusements that will never do any harm to the world.
- Voltaire

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Hannah
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Re: ~fashion~~~

Postby Hannah » Sat Dec 04, 2010 4:38 pm

Oh man that is a most excellent resource *___*!!! You have to wonder how the fuck they fit those massive shirts into ANYTHING though don't you? Especially tight pants/tailcoat sleeves, wtf??

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MmeBahorel
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Re: ~fashion~~~

Postby MmeBahorel » Sat Dec 04, 2010 8:32 pm

That's why you use a fine-quality muslin, to fit it into your coat sleeves. (my guess is that the best stuff for this was a couple ticks coarser than the see-through stuff that Josephine and her friends were wearing in the 90s, since we're generally looking at rich people who would have finer linen and tighter cuts for their coats and trousers.) I do love Jessamyn's comment on the phenomenon, that that's why everyone's arms look all sausage-y :)
What kind of literature and what kind of life is the same question. - Tom Stoppard

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Hannah
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Re: ~fashion~~~

Postby Hannah » Sat Dec 04, 2010 8:40 pm

Pfffft.

You can totes buy a ridic enormous-sleeved 1830s gown here btw!! http://www.ushist.com/19th-century_wardrobe_f.shtml Yeah they cost about $200 but. Well. IDK, if you ever have occasion to ............

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Re: ~fashion~~~

Postby Ulkis » Sat Dec 04, 2010 9:22 pm

Despard, I don't know how I missed that link before but that's really cool. Also? Not a bad looking fellow either.

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Hannah
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Re: ~fashion~~~

Postby Hannah » Sun Dec 05, 2010 6:11 am

O hay I found an... antique toile depicting Joan of Arc's.. er. Various activities (being set on fire is an activity) from around 1830!

http://www.french-treasures.com/merchan ... 3791c3.jpg

Sadly most of the other stuff on this site is laaaate late Victorian to early/mid 20th c but there's a couple interesting fabrics and textiles from relevant time periods if you look..

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Re: ~fashion~~~

Postby Ulkis » Sun Dec 05, 2010 6:16 am

Heh, Hannah, I thought it was gonna be Joan of Arc porn or some weird shit (not that it isn't still kinda weird, even if cool) because I skipped straight from "various activities" to the link. Still neat though!

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Hannah
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Re: ~fashion~~~

Postby Hannah » Sun Dec 05, 2010 6:23 am

Oh god XD

SOMEONE was totally making that in some form in the 1830s though you just know it

Here's the other two prints on that site from the early 1830s!

http://www.french-treasures.com/merchan ... 01796b.jpg

http://www.french-treasures.com/merchan ... 07248b.jpg

The second one is particularly interesting I think, with the chrome yellows and stuff! :D

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Re: ~fashion~~~

Postby Usefulbeauty » Sun Dec 05, 2010 6:32 am

Hannah wrote:Oh god XD

SOMEONE was totally making that in some form in the 1830s though you just know it


I WANT TO BELIEVE.
In other news, those are lovely prints! I agree, the yellow one is good.

A while back I think we were discussing movies with good costuming (Bright Star and Desperate Romantics, I think?). I just saw the BBC Byron series from 2003 and I loved the costumes. They had some very unique ones, which was nice because sometimes in period dramas the costumes are sort of cookie-cutter and not very exciting. I especially enjoyed Caro Lamb's clothes.
Let us read and let us dance--two amusements that will never do any harm to the world.
- Voltaire


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