-insert research squee here-

Any research done in relation to the period of Les Misérables, whether for fanfiction or fanart purposes or otherwise.
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brittlesmile
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Postby brittlesmile » Thu Jul 24, 2008 7:18 am

Marianne wrote:TheHighestPie and brittlesmile might be interested in this...

Medical Students in England and France, 1815-1858

(warning: direct link to a 350-page, 8mb PDF)

Excuse me while I squee quietly in the corner.


:shock: Thank you, thank you, thank you! I bow before your research skills.
"Détruire les abus, cela ne suffit pas; il faut modifier les moeurs. Le moulin n'y est plus, le vent y est encore."

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Marianne
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Postby Marianne » Fri Jul 25, 2008 12:59 am

bigR wrote:Once again, i love you, Marianne, but I hate JSTOR. It has so many interesting things and I've never had access to it. Also, I never really worried to learn how it worked.
When it says it is 2 pages, it is talking about the review, isn't it? Is there a way to know how long the article is, and some kind of summary? I would be willing to pay for it if it is worth it (it's only a little more than 3 euros), but I would like to have a preview of it.
Anyway, I don't think I'll be able to resist and I'll probably buy it as soon as i get back home (yes, I'm at the beach again).


I would hate JSTOR a lot more if I weren't about to go back to school in September (where I'll have acess to everything in the database via library computers).

However, I kinda had a brainfart in linking to a review of the book rather than the book itself... hey, the New York Public Library has a copy! Awesome. (And, on your side of the Atlantic, libraries in Paris, Nice, and Marseille, among others). I love WorldCat.
[Dieu] entend ta voix, ô fille des hommes! aussi bien que celle des constellations; car rien n'est petit pour celui devant lequel rien n'est grand.
- George Sand, Les sept cordes de la lyre

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bigR
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Postby bigR » Fri Aug 15, 2008 10:49 pm

I'm at the beach (yes, again) and I have only 3 minutes left at this public internet place. But I'm trying to write some fanfic on a notebook while I am sunbathing.
So, quick research question: I'm trying to avoid OC by all means. Does anyone know the name (or where could I find it) of any french actress from the 1830's or 40's. I need a young wannabee actress in 1830 for my fic. (she doesn't have to be specially good or talented, I just need the name of someone who actually existed)
IL N' Y A QUE LE RIDICULE QUI TUE

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sophiedegrouchy
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Postby sophiedegrouchy » Mon Aug 18, 2008 8:57 pm

Check out Cornélie Falcon. She might be a touch young for your purposes, and she was an opera singer, but she debued in Aug. 1832 and might be worth a shot.

Info on Wiki and here: http://books.google.com/books?id=hGOOwi ... #PPA327,M1

or here: http://books.google.com/books?id=tjAUAR ... #PPA167,M1

Looking at the second book, you could also perhaps use singer Julie Aimée Dorus-Gras, another singer. She's a bit older - born in 1805 instead of 1814.

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bigR
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Postby bigR » Tue Aug 19, 2008 4:53 am

Thank you!
I found a few useful names on wiki, but most of them had only 3 lines of info and the only one that was a little longer was about this really ugly dwarfish woman and I need my actress to be pretty.

I also have an insidious voice inside my head that's telling me to use Juliette Drouet because she was the right age, and she was starting her acting career, and she was a lady of "easy morals", and she didn't know Hugo at the time. But another voice tells me that it would be a little bit too much...
Last edited by bigR on Tue Aug 19, 2008 9:40 am, edited 2 times in total.
IL N' Y A QUE LE RIDICULE QUI TUE

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sophiedegrouchy
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Postby sophiedegrouchy » Tue Aug 19, 2008 6:12 am

This voice says DO IT. :D

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cordeliersclub
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Postby cordeliersclub » Fri Sep 05, 2008 9:26 pm

So. I am taking this class on Dostoyevsky for the lulz (just when you think I'm a real person with jobs, I throw you one and go back to school) and we are starting out with Balzac.

Today, my prof was explaining housing in Paris in the early 19th century (we are reading Old Goirot). Since we are putting the Amis in similar living situations as say, Eugene, I thought the following illustration might be helpful:

Image

(the guy at the top is my prof, when he was a poor kid at the Sorbonne in the 70s. Either that or the Smoking Gnu).

...And to give you a sense of how much I am doing in class, this is from my next page of notes:

Image

Everyone about your business now!
les Amis de l'ABC do not laugh at puns.

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MmeJavert
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Postby MmeJavert » Fri Sep 05, 2008 10:29 pm

Dare I ask what U.B. stands for? (Unholy Bourgeois?) ..or is that a "v"?
and to this day, she's glided on
always home but so far away
like a word misplaced
nothing said, what a waste

~pearl jam, "dissident"

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cordeliersclub
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Postby cordeliersclub » Fri Sep 05, 2008 10:32 pm

I think it was like Upper Bourgeois, and then ER is where I put Rastignac
les Amis de l'ABC do not laugh at puns.

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bigR
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Postby bigR » Sat Sep 06, 2008 1:11 am

It's not that I don't admire as you deserve your awesome reconstruction of a 19th century parisian house and your wonderful paintin skills :wink: , but I guess that this could be considered a slighly more sofisticated version of what your teacher told you?
Image

By the way, I love Rastignac much better than Lucien! He's much more strong, and clever, and much less melodramatic. And although he had a better heart to start with, he knew when to "kill" it on time and he was honest about it with himself.

Oh, and today I've spend the whole morning and part of the afternoon at the Institut Français doing some research on Henri IV's assassination, but at some point I stranded away from the 17th century and ended up on the Victor Hugo section, reading about Juliette Drouet and Hernani... and found more funny anecdotes for my letter. Now, someone will have to do something more serious because i am definitely focusing on the absurdities and surrealist moments of the evening :-))
IL N' Y A QUE LE RIDICULE QUI TUE

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Marianne
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Postby Marianne » Tue Sep 09, 2008 12:35 am

More research squee! I am now at Smith College and I've spent the past few weeks settling in, and tonight I finally went to the library and raided the French history stacks. A cursory overview revealed:

Le Roi et les barricades: une histoire de juin 1832
Louis Blanc's History of Ten Years (in English translation)
The French Revolution of 1830
The Students of Paris and the Revolution of 1848
Republicanism in 19th century France (I don't remember the dates it covered, but it started in 1814)
Carnet de barricades (a collection of famous authors' writings on the various revolutions and barricades in the mid-19th century)
Marianne au combat (republican symbolism and imagery)

And a lot more, but those were the most interesting-looking.

I'll start reading once I get a little bit more settled, and when I have a better idea of my courseload for the semester.
[Dieu] entend ta voix, ô fille des hommes! aussi bien que celle des constellations; car rien n'est petit pour celui devant lequel rien n'est grand.

- George Sand, Les sept cordes de la lyre

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Marianne
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Postby Marianne » Tue Sep 23, 2008 7:15 pm

*slaps forehead* So I just realized I'm on the school network, which gives me access to JSTOR from my room. So a couple relevant excerpts of the review of that "Générations romantiques" book about 19th century students:

1. Only the "facultés de droit et de médecine" were active. Pharmacy is mentioned, a few times Maison Alfort, but the "faculté de lettres" was not organized, even though there were courses like those of Cousin and Guizot.

2. ...when the government intervened with repressive legislation (1823-1827), Victor Cousin's courses were suspended, although he was only trying to liberalize the regime. Even when his course reopened (1828), professors still had to open their classes by announcing that student associations were forbidden.

Also one of the citations in the review led me straight to THIS. I don't have time to read it (stupid homework), but it looks awesome for those who speak French.

I also found a link to buy a copy of Générations romantiques, but it's almost €30. Ouch.
[Dieu] entend ta voix, ô fille des hommes! aussi bien que celle des constellations; car rien n'est petit pour celui devant lequel rien n'est grand.

- George Sand, Les sept cordes de la lyre

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cordeliersclub
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Postby cordeliersclub » Mon Nov 17, 2008 1:51 am

This isn't research so much as it is This Poster I Found

My reactions are:
1. WHAT
2. AWESOME
les Amis de l'ABC do not laugh at puns.

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bigR
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Postby bigR » Mon Nov 17, 2008 3:26 am

:lol: :lol: :lol:
oh, God, I miss our "nerdy masterwork" discussions on goodness, and innocence, and pre-revolutionary strategy, and imprisoned amis, and crazy theatre plays.

New week resolutions:

1-writing the bloody london review

2-start working on my grantaire's letter for the masterwork.
IL N' Y A QUE LE RIDICULE QUI TUE

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cordeliersclub
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Postby cordeliersclub » Thu Nov 20, 2008 3:13 am

bigR wrote::lol: :lol: :lol:
oh, God, I miss our "nerdy masterwork" discussions on goodness, and innocence, and pre-revolutionary strategy, and imprisoned amis, and crazy theatre plays.


Oh, me too. So much. BigR if you want anyone to read anything....ever...I am clearly frothing at the mouth about the Masterwork but not brave enough to start it.

Happy writing!
les Amis de l'ABC do not laugh at puns.


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