-insert research squee here-

Any research done in relation to the period of Les Misérables, whether for fanfiction or fanart purposes or otherwise.
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Marianne
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Postby Marianne » Thu Jul 17, 2008 3:30 am

I'm still here, just keeping quiet for want of anything to reply to. It doesn't help that I've just had minor surgery and I'll spend the next few days alternately cranky from pain or loopy from painkillers.
[Dieu] entend ta voix, ô fille des hommes! aussi bien que celle des constellations; car rien n'est petit pour celui devant lequel rien n'est grand.
- George Sand, Les sept cordes de la lyre

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brittlesmile
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Postby brittlesmile » Thu Jul 17, 2008 5:18 am

I'm definitely still in on the projects, but I'll be away for the next week or so.
"Détruire les abus, cela ne suffit pas; il faut modifier les moeurs. Le moulin n'y est plus, le vent y est encore."

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cordeliersclub
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Postby cordeliersclub » Thu Jul 17, 2008 6:01 am

I love this painting immediately. Especially the guy on the far left who is not at all enthused, like "Oh so you're going to SHOOT us how clever". And the boykissing in the back. And the monk, who seems to be blindfolding people in no particular order.

I've had nothing substantial to contribute. I'm really around like, all night though. However, are you guys ready for an incredibly INsubstantial contribution?:

So a few days ago, I was thinking about how my Prouvaire is a bit Flyte-y*, which reminded me about the Journalistic Hullabaloo in Brideshead Revisited when Sebastian et al go to jail for driving drunk with hookers. Now obviously this is England at Quite a Different Time, but I wonder if the arrest of a wealthy young man like Courfeyrac would rate newspaper attention? If so, just another twist of the knife for Poor Never to be Enfranchised Feuilly.

Oh Gosh Marianne are you alright? Here, I will shower you with INTERNET FLOWERS. I hope you are feeling much better without drugs very soon.


*I made that up ALL BY MYSELF
les Amis de l'ABC do not laugh at puns.

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bigR
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Postby bigR » Thu Jul 17, 2008 4:49 pm

Answers first:

-Balzac: first thing this morning I went to get a new copy of Illusions Perdues. I owned a cheap cheap cheap one (less than 1 euro) that i bought ages ago, when I didn't have a sou, with the tiniest print in the world and brownish paper. I wonder how I didn't go blind the first time i read it. Now I am the proud owner of a normal paperback edition. Actually it is a wonderful "Pocket Classiques" paperback edition with notes and and "étude de l'oeuvre" of nearly 100 pages! best thing is that I read so long ago, that I scarcely remember anything. I know that Vautrin is in it as Herrera, but was Rastignac in it too? I kind of remember he only had a cameo :cry:

-Marianne: minor surgery? I hope it was really "minor". We'll try to cheer you up with our research squees...

-Painting: I love the guy on the far left too. He looks somewhere between bored, fed-up and angry. And I haden't even noticed the boykissing. You and your dirty minds, :wink:

-Flyte-y Prouvaire! You're not planning now on having him walking around Paris with a teddy bear under his arm, aren't you? And I must have a cruel streak or something, but I still find SO tempting the idea of sending him to jail...
The newspaper thing sounds reasonable. I should know something more about it since I wrote I don't know how many papers on 19th century press while I was in college. But somehow, I always managed to turn the assignements round and write about the last page feuilletons while my class mates studied the political and social news, so...

And squee!:

Check this link
http://www.paris-pittoresque.com/costumes/index.htm

and click on Costumes et mœurs à Paris sous la Restauration
and Costumes et mœurs à Paris en 1830.
It seems to be mainly about women's fashion (which can be useful too, since maybe our boys want to make a nice present to some girl or other), but there is also a lot of information about all kind of things, from the best fashion and furniture shops, to fashionable promenades, cafés, restaurants, songs, famous salons, sports, games, gambling tripots, bals, amusements. Most surprising discovery: the "montagnes russes!"(roller coasters). Can you imagine a roaler coaster ride in early 19th century and the safety of it? please, please, no matter how safe the owner say it is, don't let Bossuet take a ride!

Also, if someone has a deeper interest in the parisian dance halls (courfeyrac? bossuet?), I've found this:

http://compagnie.danse.19e.free.fr/Le-b ... umiere.php

On the left you have links for many other popular bals. Le Ranelagh link has also a small pic from 1838
http://compagnie.danse.19e.free.fr/Le-b ... nelagh.php with small pic from 38
Last edited by bigR on Thu Jul 17, 2008 9:30 pm, edited 1 time in total.
IL N' Y A QUE LE RIDICULE QUI TUE

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Marianne
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Postby Marianne » Thu Jul 17, 2008 7:12 pm

Haha I thought the guy on the far left was giving the kissin' boys the stinkeye. He looks so generally Not Impressed.

(And fear not--I got my wisdom teeth out, that's all. Mmm, oatmeal.)
[Dieu] entend ta voix, ô fille des hommes! aussi bien que celle des constellations; car rien n'est petit pour celui devant lequel rien n'est grand.

- George Sand, Les sept cordes de la lyre

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cordeliersclub
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Postby cordeliersclub » Sat Jul 19, 2008 1:32 am

Marianne, I hope you are enjoying your wisdom toothless life.

Further:

Research Question: Does anyone know where I can find/already have at hand information on international exchange rates in, like, the 1830s? After the Napoleonic Wars, England was beginning an effort to back currency with gold bullion (the note was officially backed in the 1830s sometime), but France didn't take it up until the 1870s.

France was gearing up to be the tastemaker of Europe by the 1850s...but then there's the end of Napoleon and all these violent insurrections which must play hell with the economy. How on earth did one spend money internationally??

If you even know of a good, like, "Financial History of Europe" or "The World Didn't Always Have Fiat Currency" book, I would honestly read it and report back.
les Amis de l'ABC do not laugh at puns.

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Marianne
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Postby Marianne » Sat Jul 19, 2008 2:47 am

In that shiny book on Babbage I was reading a few weeks ago, it gave the exchange rate circa 1850 as about 25 francs to the pound. And France was on a bimetallic system before they started backing with gold, so the currencies were pretty stable (not counting Gold Rush-era inflation, but that's after our boys' time).

This site is useful: http://www.cyberussr.com/hcunn/gold-std.html
[Dieu] entend ta voix, ô fille des hommes! aussi bien que celle des constellations; car rien n'est petit pour celui devant lequel rien n'est grand.

- George Sand, Les sept cordes de la lyre

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cordeliersclub
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Postby cordeliersclub » Mon Jul 21, 2008 5:12 am

This is awesome, thanks so much!
les Amis de l'ABC do not laugh at puns.

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Marianne
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Postby Marianne » Wed Jul 23, 2008 4:40 am

TheHighestPie and brittlesmile might be interested in this...

Medical Students in England and France, 1815-1858

(warning: direct link to a 350-page, 8mb PDF)

Excuse me while I squee quietly in the corner.
[Dieu] entend ta voix, ô fille des hommes! aussi bien que celle des constellations; car rien n'est petit pour celui devant lequel rien n'est grand.

- George Sand, Les sept cordes de la lyre

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Mamselle Miss
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Postby Mamselle Miss » Wed Jul 23, 2008 4:12 pm

Who says you have to squee quietly. I say, let it out!

Anyway, I was wondering if anyone could find me some information on prisons in 19th century France in English. I've looked on Google Books, but all the good stuff was in another language.
Laughter is not all a bad beginning for a friendship, and it is far the best ending for one.
-Oscar Wilde

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bigR
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Postby bigR » Wed Jul 23, 2008 4:47 pm

Marianne I LOVE YOU. This is the most wonderful find. May I join you in your corner and squee with you?
It certainly is more useful for brittlesmile and The HighestPie, but it is interesting for everybody. It is the most complete about 19th century students I have never come accross. It has plenty of useful details for everyone. Exemple: in most 19th century novels when young people come to study to Paris they seem to forget about their families, because they seem to never visit them. Now, I knew that the winter semester started in november, but I ignored that it wasn't such a thing as summer holidays.
By the way, medical students had a really tight schedule, poor guys... and I loved the little details, like when it says that it was forbidden to carry a cane to the courses. Take note, Joly! :-)
IL N' Y A QUE LE RIDICULE QUI TUE

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Marianne
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Postby Marianne » Wed Jul 23, 2008 6:30 pm

......aaaand, through the time-honored technique of always, always raid the works cited page, I have stumbled upon quite possibly the holy grail of Ami research.

Générations romantiques: les étudiants et le quartier latin (1814-1851)

Students! Romanticism! The Latin Quarter! Political involvement! The only problem is it's on JSTOR and if you want to read it, you have to either pay them or belong to a school/institution with access to the site. I suppose I could wait until I'm at school in the fall, but I want to read that sucker RIGHT NOW.
[Dieu] entend ta voix, ô fille des hommes! aussi bien que celle des constellations; car rien n'est petit pour celui devant lequel rien n'est grand.

- George Sand, Les sept cordes de la lyre

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sophiedegrouchy
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Postby sophiedegrouchy » Wed Jul 23, 2008 9:33 pm

SQUEE!!

I kind of love you, and I bow down before your research prowess.

Thanks! :D

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cordeliersclub
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Postby cordeliersclub » Thu Jul 24, 2008 1:43 am

Oh. My. Gawd. !!!!

I love JSTOR so so so so much but I love Marianne's ability to navigate it (even on drugs!) EQUALLY AS MUCH and because I am plainly contributing nothing to research squee, I'm off to the fic threat to post the Enjolras-is-Nancy-Drew fic I wrote so.

Parfait parfait parfait.
les Amis de l'ABC do not laugh at puns.

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bigR
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Postby bigR » Thu Jul 24, 2008 3:40 am

Once again, i love you, Marianne, but I hate JSTOR. It has so many interesting things and I've never had access to it. Also, I never really worried to learn how it worked.
When it says it is 2 pages, it is talking about the review, isn't it? Is there a way to know how long the article is, and some kind of summary? I would be willing to pay for it if it is worth it (it's only a little more than 3 euros), but I would like to have a preview of it.
Anyway, I don't think I'll be able to resist and I'll probably buy it as soon as i get back home (yes, I'm at the beach again).
IL N' Y A QUE LE RIDICULE QUI TUE


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