-insert research squee here-

Any research done in relation to the period of Les Misérables, whether for fanfiction or fanart purposes or otherwise.
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Col.Despard
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Re: -insert research squee here-

Postby Col.Despard » Mon Apr 19, 2010 9:34 pm

I *so* want to get my French up to scratch to be able to read this - if there's one thing I adore, it's a primary source...and I love trawling through newspapers (I get highly distracted, true - many is the odd byway I've gone down thanks to an interesting article).

And I can't believe I missed the notes on Enjolras' name...love it! I see Marguerite has already made good use of this in the latest chapter of "A Passion for the Absolute".
"The principles of freedom, of humanity, and of justice, will finally triumph over falsehood, tyranny and delusion, and every principle inimical to the interests of the human race" - Edward Despard, 1803
http://coloneldespard.deviantart.com/

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Aurelia Combeferre
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Re: -insert research squee here-

Postby Aurelia Combeferre » Thu Apr 29, 2010 5:27 am

I've been poring through the links here (especially the maps). Lovely, useful stuff for the rewrites of my fics---especially with figuring out how to cope with the cholera. Thanks much!
"...all aptitudes having equal opportunity; politically, all votes having equal weight; religiously, all consciences having equal rights."

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silverwhistle
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Maurois biography of Vic!

Postby silverwhistle » Tue Aug 10, 2010 6:31 pm

Picked up a secondhand copy of André Maurois's biography of Victor for just £1!
Very interesting: I didn't know much about his family background. Some fascinating leads…
- Entends-tu? je t'aime! cria-t-il encore.
- Quel amour! dit la malheureuse en frémissant.
Il reprit: - L'amour d'un damné.

Victor Hugo, Notre Dame de Paris

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silverwhistle
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Re: -insert research squee here-

Postby silverwhistle » Thu Aug 26, 2010 10:04 pm

A friend of mine (LJ's syntinen_laulu) is shortly going to visit Montreuil-sur-Mer. I have asked her to see if she can bring back some postcards & c.!
- Entends-tu? je t'aime! cria-t-il encore.
- Quel amour! dit la malheureuse en frémissant.
Il reprit: - L'amour d'un damné.

Victor Hugo, Notre Dame de Paris

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Marianne
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Re: -insert research squee here-

Postby Marianne » Thu Aug 26, 2010 10:31 pm

Awesome--for such a small town, there's a lot to check out in Montreuil. Kayaking on the Canche, some lovely walks in the area, the ramparts and citadel, a small art gallery, odd little shops, and of course the town itself is lovely and you can kill a weekend just wandering around there sampling local beers named after Valjean and having picnics on the ramparts. And the people in the tourist office are more than happy--more than happy--to load you down with local Hugo-related loot.

There's also a really neat abandoned mill on the opposite bank of the river, visible from some parts of the lower town. It's not immediately obvious how to get there, but if you cross the bridge and head straight out of town for about an eighth of a mile, there's a left turn onto a winding road that eventually leads right to the mill. It's not closed off or anything--Marguerite and I spent an afternoon exploring it.

(Google maps for the mill)
[Dieu] entend ta voix, ô fille des hommes! aussi bien que celle des constellations; car rien n'est petit pour celui devant lequel rien n'est grand.
- George Sand, Les sept cordes de la lyre

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MmeJavert
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Re: -insert research squee here-

Postby MmeJavert » Sun Sep 12, 2010 5:53 pm

Er, I'm not sure this counts as squee, but I sure as hell have been wondering about this one for a LONG time, without wanting to actually, uh, post about it myself. Thank you, little_details poster!

http://community.livejournal.com/little ... style=mine


Before you dismiss this as irrelevant... scroll down. There's a comment JUST about urban Paris. :D I am going to happily assume this is in use during our time period, since most of the comments/the post itself is referring to 18/19th century.
and to this day, she's glided on
always home but so far away
like a word misplaced
nothing said, what a waste

~pearl jam, "dissident"

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MmeBahorel
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Re: -insert research squee here-

Postby MmeBahorel » Tue Nov 02, 2010 11:17 pm

Because I am a nerd, I've been collating a certain amount of OMG SHINY into a more usable format:

Behold the Timeline: 1800-1832

Ignore the specific dates in blue, as those are birth and death dates I'm assigning in my own personal universe; likewise, events in red are personal universe events. Everything in black is what's going on in the world at the specific time. Everything in green is a weather event (thank you, Arago). Everything in purple is a canon event (which isn't easy as Victor gets his timeline screwed up, and I've only gone as far as Valjean retrieving Cosette - Fantine signed a letter a month after she died, her hair apparently never grew back over a year after she sold it, and this is just as far as I've gotten).

I still need to fill in more specifics on some of the nationalist movements and some of the foreign policy stuff, but this collates Wikipedia (French and English editions), the Marxists.org timeline, and anything else I've been able to find. I'll keep updating it as I find more shiny stuff that cries out to be added (because the little details like when the giraffe arrived at the Jardin des Plantes are just fun to throw around) and as we move through the novel on the read-through and I can attempt to nail down some additional plausible timeframes.
What kind of literature and what kind of life is the same question. - Tom Stoppard

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hazellwood
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Re: -insert research squee here-

Postby hazellwood » Tue Nov 02, 2010 11:27 pm

omg

I am going to use this forever. Thank you so much for posting. :shock:

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Aurelia Combeferre
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Re: -insert research squee here-

Postby Aurelia Combeferre » Wed Nov 03, 2010 5:35 am

Ohmigosh, THANK YOU!

This is useful, since in my fic, I'm going to be reconstructing the correspondence of the Amis del'ABC from 1828 up to June 4, 1832. It would be useful to know what events the boys would be alluding to other than July 1830! :D :D :D
"...all aptitudes having equal opportunity; politically, all votes having equal weight; religiously, all consciences having equal rights."

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Col.Despard
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Re: -insert research squee here-

Postby Col.Despard » Thu Nov 04, 2010 8:24 am

This is fantastic! What a much needed resource - just reading it set out like that generates all sorts of ideas and connections. I love a timeline...I need to see things set out.

And I love the fact it references your fic!
"The principles of freedom, of humanity, and of justice, will finally triumph over falsehood, tyranny and delusion, and every principle inimical to the interests of the human race" - Edward Despard, 1803

http://coloneldespard.deviantart.com/

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MmeJavert
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Re: -insert research squee here-

Postby MmeJavert » Fri Jan 07, 2011 4:45 am

This is really only very tenuously related to the fandom, BUT I found it while researching a fic. Admittedly not all of the material is from the 1820s-1830s either, but I wanted some information from the, y'know, general area.

"Reconsidering drugs: mapping Victorian and modern drug discourses By Lawrence Victor Driscoll"

Um. I am writing fanfic (which, uh, is for my santa present, in point of fact), in which I decided there needed to be some sort of mind-altering drug. Opium turned out to be less apropos for the time period than hashish, and now that I'm in my last-minute editing/polishing phase I decided I wanted to improve upon the drugged-out part. So I went looking for general-period impressions of the drug and its availability etc. I THINK it was available-ish in Paris at the time, though I got around it in a sort of silly way.

ANYWAY I thought it was really interesting reading and it sort of helped me write my fic soooooo maybe it will be of interest to someone else, too?
and to this day, she's glided on
always home but so far away
like a word misplaced
nothing said, what a waste

~pearl jam, "dissident"

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MmeBahorel
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Re: -insert research squee here-

Postby MmeBahorel » Sun Feb 26, 2012 4:52 am

Just found a new source on newspapers: "The Parisian Newspaper Press", from The Museum of Foreign Literature and Science, vol. 20, 1832. (scroll to p. 450 for the article)

That's right, 1832. It's an article in English about all the major daily papers in France. With heavy, gossipy editorialising. "The Journal de Paris has fallen into such contempt that although it is despatched gratis to several places, no one takes the pains to peruse it . . ." In other words, on-the-ground, unvarnished opinions, not a historian trying to make sense of the Parisian press of the time.

Yay for Google Books.
What kind of literature and what kind of life is the same question. - Tom Stoppard

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MmeBahorel
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Re: -insert research squee here-

Postby MmeBahorel » Sat Mar 03, 2012 11:34 pm

Currently in the middle of Graham Robb's The Discovery of France: A Historical Geography. Not only is it the usual entertaining Graham Robb with fun and useful examples, but he's actually following directly in the path of Fernand Braudel without bothering to draw conclusions. I don't quite want to call it the "easy reader" version of the first volume of Braudel's The Identity of France, but Robb is using some of the exact same examples to cover the exact same themes.

Robb has here an excellent resource for anyone who needs to get further into the mindset and life of the provinces, generally following the peasants and working classes and trying to mediate bourgeois descriptions of them with the plausible realities of their lives. Braudel is following the same path but at a high academic level. Robb gives something more of an impressionist painting, while Braudel is very much a detailed monograph on the subject. Robb has some helpful maps with political boundaries, linguistic divisions, that sort of thing; Braudel's 4th figure (of 38 in his first volume) is a map showing the spread of various styles of roofing material.

I'm recommending both as helpful in a general sense, particularly if you haven't done much research on working classes and the provinces (I'm getting a bunch of stuff on language and migrations I already know, but I've also been doing this for quite some time). But the Robb is easy to get hold of (I picked up my copy at Borders when it was going out of business and most library systems should have copy) and entertaining as hell, so I recommend it as particularly fun. If you find you want additional detail/further discussion, move on to Braudel's masterwork. (I think Braudel is still best known for Capitalism and Material Life: 1400-1800, which is a very interesting analysis of the development of capitalism in pre-industrial Europe, but one should probably be mindful that Braudel was working at a period where Marxist historical analysis was very popular and he's arguing against that, sort of, so there's a particular focus to his work.)
What kind of literature and what kind of life is the same question. - Tom Stoppard

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Aurelia Combeferre
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Re: -insert research squee here-

Postby Aurelia Combeferre » Mon Oct 01, 2012 11:35 am

More like classtime squee: I heard the story of how Laennec invented the stethoscope.

So back in the 1800s, doctors would listen to breathing and heartbeat by pressing their ears flat to the patients' chests. Easier said than done, especially where the fairer sex is concerned. Now Laennec was trying to figure out a way to examine his female patients, when he caught sight of two boys shouting messages to each other using a long tube. He made a similar device, only with an earpiece, and started bringing it to work.
"...all aptitudes having equal opportunity; politically, all votes having equal weight; religiously, all consciences having equal rights."

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moderntrickster
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Re: -insert research squee here-

Postby moderntrickster » Mon Jan 07, 2013 4:41 pm

The list is mostly for the 1840-50s, but I found a breakdown of the cost of living in Paris, as observed by Honoré Daumier here.
Suffering seems to be the inevitable fate of the creative sensitive types. Poverty, disease, death, unrequited love affairs, and disappointments of every sort fan the flame of the artistic spirit. - Henry Miller


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