-insert research squee here-

Any research done in relation to the period of Les Misérables, whether for fanfiction or fanart purposes or otherwise.
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Marianne
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-insert research squee here-

Postby Marianne » Fri May 30, 2008 5:10 am

Google Books is going to be the death of me. However, I think that if I posted every new OOH SHINY on the other thread, it would get annoying and off-topic really fast. So. A thread for geeky research, and squeeing thereover.

Prompted by this: Look what I just bought off Amazon! (Google has a limited preview, so you can read bits and pieces of the shiny but there are pages missing all over the place.)
[Dieu] entend ta voix, ô fille des hommes! aussi bien que celle des constellations; car rien n'est petit pour celui devant lequel rien n'est grand.
- George Sand, Les sept cordes de la lyre

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Mamselle Miss
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Postby Mamselle Miss » Sun Jun 01, 2008 1:39 am

^I saw that one. It's terribly tempting...

Also, on Google Books I found two period books on the July Revolution.

Memoirs of General Lafayette:And the French Revolution of 1830
and
Charles the Tenth and Louis-Phillipe: The Secret History of the Revolution of July 1830

I think Google Books might be the death of me too.
Laughter is not all a bad beginning for a friendship, and it is far the best ending for one.
-Oscar Wilde

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Postby cordeliersclub » Sun Jun 01, 2008 2:01 am

Yeaaaah I just bought the same book because, holy shit LOOK AT IT. Also I have this thing with research that makes me want to email the http://www.uky.edu/~popkin/ author when I'm done.

I don't have the time or money for this; how romantic--!
les Amis de l'ABC do not laugh at puns.

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Postby Marianne » Sun Jun 01, 2008 6:00 am

Charles the Tenth and Louis-Phillipe: The Secret History of the Revolution of July 1830

That one is hilarious. It's by a bunch of British royalists determined to unmask the scum, rabble, and conspirators behind the July Revolution, and it's so blatantly partisan that all you can do is sit back and laugh (and take note of the little details they provide on the day-to-day events of the revolution).
[Dieu] entend ta voix, ô fille des hommes! aussi bien que celle des constellations; car rien n'est petit pour celui devant lequel rien n'est grand.

- George Sand, Les sept cordes de la lyre

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Postby Mamselle Miss » Mon Jun 02, 2008 5:18 pm

I got about halfway through Charles the Tenth yesterday. My favorite part is the frequent use of "Shame, thrice shame!" The other thing is that the authors present the whole thing as the unvarnished truth. I snickerd quite a bit while reading.
Laughter is not all a bad beginning for a friendship, and it is far the best ending for one.

-Oscar Wilde

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Postby brittlesmile » Wed Jun 04, 2008 10:23 pm

This is probably only of interest to TheHighestPie and myself, but I just found a giant sciency archive. I'm still in the process of sifting through the massive amount of links to see what's worthwhile, but so many links, so little time.
"Détruire les abus, cela ne suffit pas; il faut modifier les moeurs. Le moulin n'y est plus, le vent y est encore."

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Postby sophiedegrouchy » Wed Jun 04, 2008 10:34 pm

Yay!! Med links! :D

Thank you!

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SylvieProuvaire1832
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Postby SylvieProuvaire1832 » Thu Jun 05, 2008 2:00 am

Just wanted to say I love your signature, HighestPie!
Have courage for the greatest sorrows of life and patience for the small ones, and when you have labouriously acomplished your daily tasks, go to sleep in peace. God is awake.

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Postby sophiedegrouchy » Thu Jun 05, 2008 4:39 am

Thanks :)

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Postby bigR » Thu Jun 05, 2008 9:59 pm

Great Big Squee!

I know, I know that you haven't agreed to it yet, but I am having so much fun reading about the Hernani première that I just have to share some of it.
And I think that I have found the model that inspired Hugo for Prouvaire!!! Get a hold:

«a sculptor known as Jehan du Seigneur (a medievalized form of Jean Duseigneur), who dressed in black and parted his hair on both sides to form a pointed crest above his forehead symbolizing “the flame of genius” ».

Hugo’s supporters already strolled around Paris with long curls, huge spanish cloaks and daggers before the play opened (They even signed a petition asking the Government to institute bull-fights in Paris! :D ), but the première was even better than any of our premières of Lord of the Rings, Harry Potter or Starwars, with freaky fans dressed up as the characters.
A lot of the pro-Hernani young people were dressed up like characters from a Velázquez painting!!! Others wore Robespierre waistcoats or 16th century bonnets, and «one frightening specimen wore a broad-rimmed hat, pale green trousers with black velvet stripes, vast lapels and –after several sessions with a baffled tailor- a doublet, padded like a breastplate, in purplish-red satin. An important nuance. Bright red would have had a political connotation, whereas the doublet stood for pure, militant aestheticism. This was Théophile Gautier».

Oh, come on! We have to do this!
Last edited by bigR on Fri Jun 06, 2008 2:00 am, edited 1 time in total.
IL N' Y A QUE LE RIDICULE QUI TUE

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Postby Mamselle Miss » Thu Jun 05, 2008 11:03 pm

Now that sounds like a party!

It's almost too bad that Feuilly can't really afford to go to the theatre, because that would be one premier he would not want to miss. My Feuilly would really enjoy watching that audience.
Laughter is not all a bad beginning for a friendship, and it is far the best ending for one.

-Oscar Wilde

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Postby MmeJavert » Fri Jun 06, 2008 12:35 am

I'll bet you any price you care to name Jehan probably would've jumped at the chance to dress like one of the characters. :lol:
and to this day, she's glided on
always home but so far away
like a word misplaced
nothing said, what a waste

~pearl jam, "dissident"

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Postby bigR » Fri Jun 06, 2008 1:00 am

Mamselle Miss wrote:It's almost too bad that Feuilly can't really afford to go to the theatre, because that would be one premier he would not want to miss. My Feuilly would really enjoy watching that audience.


Oh! But dear monsieur Hugo had "battalion leaders" distributing free passes on red paper stamped with the word "Hierro" (Iron in spanish) "in the cafés and studios of the Latin Quarter".

So I say, let's have everyone (well, maybe not Enjolras) go to the world première of Hernani, ou L'Honneur Castillan: blood, passion, revenge, doomed lovers, and dark villians!
Let's show those hypocrital and bourgeois academics that "la voix haute et puissante du peuple veut que la poésie ait la même devise que la politique : TOLÉRANCE ET LIBERTÉ"

(not that R cares much about showing anything to any academics or about the voice of the people, but the more Amis in there, the more fun :D )
IL N' Y A QUE LE RIDICULE QUI TUE

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MmeJavert
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Postby MmeJavert » Fri Jun 06, 2008 1:06 am

Enjolras would rather not waste his time on such frivolous nonsense. ;)
and to this day, she's glided on
always home but so far away
like a word misplaced
nothing said, what a waste

~pearl jam, "dissident"

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SylvieProuvaire1832
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Postby SylvieProuvaire1832 » Fri Jun 06, 2008 2:04 am

Marius might not want to go, but if Bossuet or Courferyac or someone dragged him out... :D
Have courage for the greatest sorrows of life and patience for the small ones, and when you have labouriously acomplished your daily tasks, go to sleep in peace. God is awake.


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