Artistic Representations of the 1830/32 Uprisings From the Period

Any research done in relation to the period of Les Misérables, whether for fanfiction or fanart purposes or otherwise.
User avatar
deHavilland
Posts: 4865
Joined: Tue Feb 12, 2013 10:21 pm
Location: Toronto, ON
Contact:

Artistic Representations of the 1830/32 Uprisings From the Period

Postby deHavilland » Thu Apr 06, 2017 12:56 am

The gorgeous piece below by Jean-Victor Schnetz came up on Tumblr today, and I thought maybe it would be worth digging up and building a little collection here of works from the period depicting the moments that the boys could have been featured in. Feel free to add more!

Image
“Combat devant l'Hôtel de Ville de Paris le 28 juillet 1830″, Jean-Victor Schnetz (1834)


Image
"Rohan Road combat, 29 July 1830," Hippolyte Lecomte (1831)


Image
"Battle for Porte Saint Denis, 28 July 1830" Hippolyte Lecomte (1831)


Image
"Taking of the Louvre and massacre of the Swiss Guards, July 29, 1830," Jean Louis Bezard (1830)


and, obviously:

Image
"Liberty Leading the People," Eugène Delacroix (1830)
"Quand vous aurez besoin de Bahorel, capitaine, Bahorel est là! Je sais faire trébucher tous les chevaux du garde-corps avec une ficelle... Rien qu'une petite ficelle. Enfin, pensez à Bahorel du Café Musain!"

User avatar
CC21106
Posts: 435
Joined: Sat Sep 24, 2016 10:07 pm
Location: Texas

Re: Artistic Representations of the 1830/32 Uprisings From the Period

Postby CC21106 » Thu Apr 06, 2017 10:10 pm

Cooool. That is exactly how they would have seen themselves--and OT how the people in the Texas Revolution (1836) saw themselves.
I have always wondered about the dead guy with no pants in Liberty Leading the People. Has someone taken a few minutes off the barricade to steal them? Is that supposed to be a hint about how poor the people are?
Don't mess with Texas! We mess up enough by ourselves.
I have actually made bullets like they're doing in my avatar. Then loaded the gun with a ramrod, and shot it. But I'm not feeling real good about guns right now.

User avatar
deHavilland
Posts: 4865
Joined: Tue Feb 12, 2013 10:21 pm
Location: Toronto, ON
Contact:

Re: Artistic Representations of the 1830/32 Uprisings From the Period

Postby deHavilland » Fri Apr 07, 2017 12:29 am

It's funny but I've never actually noticed that before. Of course, looking at it now it's totally obvious that that dude has no pants on. The fact that he also only has one sock reads like some kind of violation to me, too, now that I look at it.

People are so desperate that they're willing to resort to stealing from their own to get by?
"Quand vous aurez besoin de Bahorel, capitaine, Bahorel est là! Je sais faire trébucher tous les chevaux du garde-corps avec une ficelle... Rien qu'une petite ficelle. Enfin, pensez à Bahorel du Café Musain!"

User avatar
23623
Posts: 498
Joined: Wed Dec 23, 2015 7:08 am

Re: Artistic Representations of the 1830/32 Uprisings From the Period

Postby 23623 » Fri Apr 14, 2017 4:08 pm

I was reading the wikipedia of Les Mis and its characters to collect illustrations and found this one:

Image

Source: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File ... uselang=fr

Off topic but I just found that Azelma actually has a wikipedia page which only has three lines but points out a very important fact:
Azelma est l'un des personnages du roman Les Misérables de Victor Hugo. Elle est la fille cadette des Thénardier. Bien qu'on en parle peu tout au long du roman, elle sera l'un des rares personnages encore vivants à la fin de l'œuvre

I have a sudden urge to create three-sentence wikipedia pages for every minor character in Les Mis, especially those who seem to have survived in the end. :lol:
Revolution, but civilization

Rachel
Posts: 2055
Joined: Fri Mar 29, 2013 7:57 am

Re: Artistic Representations of the 1830/32 Uprisings From the Period

Postby Rachel » Wed May 03, 2017 8:48 pm

deHavilland wrote:It's funny but I've never actually noticed that before. Of course, looking at it now it's totally obvious that that dude has no pants on. The fact that he also only has one sock reads like some kind of violation to me, too, now that I look at it.

People are so desperate that they're willing to resort to stealing from their own to get by?


I asked my history teacher about this today and her thoughts was that it was an allusion to the Sans Culottes?
Image

Clearly, I have fantastic luck in the dating field.

Quotes to live by:
"This is highly illegal!" ~Inspector Javert (The Girl Nextdoor)

User avatar
23623
Posts: 498
Joined: Wed Dec 23, 2015 7:08 am

Re: Artistic Representations of the 1830/32 Uprisings From the Period

Postby 23623 » Wed Jun 21, 2017 4:53 am

I almost forget that I've seen this one on tumblr before.

Here.
Revolution, but civilization


Return to “Nerdy Fannish Research”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest

cron