L'ami du Peuple

Any research done in relation to the period of Les Misérables, whether for fanfiction or fanart purposes or otherwise.
Rachel
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L'ami du Peuple

Postby Rachel » Sat Jun 01, 2013 6:42 pm

As my French is far too shaky to understand the original ones, is there anywhere I could find translated articles of L'ami du Peuple, particularly the ones that want more death and murder, since this story is supposed to be sympathetic to Charlotte Corday?

And does anyone know anything of Charlotte Corday's actual personality, since all I can find is the fact she was a Girondist and thought the revolution was spiralling out of control?
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deHavilland
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Re: L'ami du Peuple

Postby deHavilland » Sun Jun 02, 2013 3:45 am

Here's what I can give you on Corday, Rachel, pulled from my copy of Citizens;

Watching the parade was a strikingly good-looking woman of twenty-five named Charlotte Corday d'Armont. The house in Caen where she lodged was just a few paces away from the Intendance, where the Girondins had made their headquarters. Since often, from the balcony, they exercised their oratory on sympathetic crowds, she had heard them many times... Charlotte Corday was already consumed with an intense, almost feverish hatred for the Jacobins, whose conduct on May 31 and June 2, she believed, had brought the Republic to the lowest level of degradation.

It was a republic she wished to see flourish. For although Charlotte had been born in a timbered manor house to a family of minor Norman gentry, she was by no means a royalist... She had read deeply in Rousseau and the standard Roman histories and imagined the Revolution as dedicated to bringing about an exalted moral transformation.


And then of her time in prison/on trial;

Charlotte stressed her own resolve and believed that the common delusion that women were incapable of such acts had played to her advantage. It was evidently a point of honor with her - and in deliberate repudiation of the revolutionary stereotypes of gender - to affirm that her sex was both physically and morally more than strong enough to commit acts of patriotic violence.


During one of her cross-examinations with Montané, she stated,

"I was a republican well before the Revolution and I have never lacked energy."


After her arrest she wrote two letters, one to the politician Charles Barbaroux and the other to her father, begging for his forgiveness. I think you can derive something of a personality out of that, obviously no text book is going to give you the run down on her as a human being. Her mother and older sister died when she was a child and it was then her father sent her and a younger sister to be raised at a convent in Caen where it's supposed she first encountered the writings of Rousseau in the convent library.
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Rachel
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Re: L'ami du Peuple

Postby Rachel » Sun Jun 02, 2013 3:50 am

deHavvy, you're amazing! Thank you so much!

Charlotte Corday fascinates me to no end, and thank you thank you thank you!
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between4walls
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Re: L'ami du Peuple

Postby between4walls » Fri Jun 07, 2013 2:34 am

The ever-useful marxists.org has a whole bunch of Marat's articles here.

For some examples of violent rhetoric (not the best known ones, just some random ones I found in these articles):

From the article "Freedom is Lost": "O foolish nation! Why haven’t you renounced your vain babbling and followed the advice of your friend, armed yourself with rope, with daggers, and ended the days of those of your defeated enemies who would have the audacity to rise up again."

From "The Flight of the Royal Family": "There is only one means left to pull you back from the precipice to which your unworthy chiefs have led you, and that’s to immediately name a military tribune, a supreme dictator, to put down the principal known traitors...The moment has arrived to make fall the heads of the ministers and their subalterns, of Mottié, of all the scoundrels at headquarters and all the anti-patriotic battalion commanders, of Bailly [mayor of Paris, held responsible for the massacre of the Champs-de-Mars], of all the counter-revolutionary municipal officers, of all traitors in the National Assembly. Begin by assuring yourselves of their persons, if there’s still time [footnote 1: I wager you a thousand that Mottié, all the informers of headquarters, and all the anti-patriotic battalion commanders have fled with the king.]"

Otoh, these quotes are not specifically against the Girondins, which would have been what angered Corday, a Girondin. I will try to find some of those.
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between4walls
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Re: L'ami du Peuple

Postby between4walls » Fri Jun 07, 2013 2:40 am

It should be pointed out that L'Ami du Peuple was, as far as I can tell, discontinued in September 1792, replaced by Marat's new paper Journale de la Republique Francaise, which was in April 1793 renamed Publiciste de la Revolution Francaise. So if you are looking for articles closer to his assassination, look for the two later newspapers rather than L'Ami du Peuple.
Here day embraces night, and says: I will die with you and you will be reborn with me. From the heavy embrace of all desolations springs faith.

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Re: L'ami du Peuple

Postby Rachel » Fri Jun 07, 2013 2:43 am

Ah, you guys are the best! And thank you for telling me I was searching the wrong newspaper entirely, because I could've wasted a lot of time with that!
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between4walls
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Re: L'ami du Peuple

Postby between4walls » Fri Jun 07, 2013 2:53 am

Here's a sympathetic and detailed article on Corday via googlebooks.
Here day embraces night, and says: I will die with you and you will be reborn with me. From the heavy embrace of all desolations springs faith.

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Re: L'ami du Peuple

Postby between4walls » Fri Jun 07, 2013 3:26 am

From the accounts I've read, it seems like Corday was more inspired to her deed by Girondin speeches against the Montagnards and particularly Marat, rather than by having read Marat's articles. So it might also be pertinent to look at what accusations the Girondins made against Marat (they put him on trial once, unsuccessfully) to see what Corday might have been thinking.
Here day embraces night, and says: I will die with you and you will be reborn with me. From the heavy embrace of all desolations springs faith.

The real name of devotion is disinterestedness.

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between4walls
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Re: L'ami du Peuple

Postby between4walls » Fri Jun 07, 2013 3:37 am

Hereare the archives of La Patriote francois (in French, sorry. I suck at French but if you want something translated I can try and there's so many fluent people in this fandom).
Here day embraces night, and says: I will die with you and you will be reborn with me. From the heavy embrace of all desolations springs faith.

The real name of devotion is disinterestedness.

Rachel
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Re: L'ami du Peuple

Postby Rachel » Fri Jun 07, 2013 3:40 am

Yeah, but I wanted his papers to see what he said that pissed off the Girondins so much.

And my research has the same results. :)
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between4walls
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Re: L'ami du Peuple

Postby between4walls » Fri Jun 07, 2013 4:16 am

Oh, now I understand. :)

I asked someone who's doing a thesis on the revolution if they know where to find the articles; I'll see if they reply and if they can't find it, I give up.
Here day embraces night, and says: I will die with you and you will be reborn with me. From the heavy embrace of all desolations springs faith.

The real name of devotion is disinterestedness.

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between4walls
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Re: L'ami du Peuple

Postby between4walls » Fri Jun 07, 2013 9:40 pm

Okay, the person I ask doesn't know where to find English translations, though they suggest that this websitein French may have the articles.

Sorry, Rachel. Wish I could have found something more helpful and hope your story goes well.
Here day embraces night, and says: I will die with you and you will be reborn with me. From the heavy embrace of all desolations springs faith.

The real name of devotion is disinterestedness.


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