Question: Jacquerie vs. Revolution?

Any research done in relation to the period of Les Misérables, whether for fanfiction or fanart purposes or otherwise.
un_nuage_traversant
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Question: Jacquerie vs. Revolution?

Postby un_nuage_traversant » Sat Mar 30, 2013 10:11 pm

I'm reading Les Mis right now and I've gotten to this part (Volume IV, Book VII- Slang, Chapter III) where Hugo discusses the differences of Jacquerie and revolution. I looked the definition of Jacquerie up, and it sounds just like a revolution and I have no idea why he says that a revolution is a vaccine to a Jacquerie (the latter he seems to hate).
Is there anyone who's read the book that understands?

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Gervais
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Re: Question: Jacquerie vs. Revolution?

Postby Gervais » Sat Mar 30, 2013 10:19 pm

Hello! :mrgreen: Care to introduce yourself in Introductions sometime?

There's definitely more people here that can give you a more thorough answer, but from what I understand, it's mostly connotations. Jacquerie, from what I understand, is strictly a peasant rebellion (the original Jacquerie), while Revolution implies a change.
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"The peas, Woyzeck. The PEAS."

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Re: Question: Jacquerie vs. Revolution?

Postby deHavilland » Sat Mar 30, 2013 10:56 pm

Hence, if the ill-fortune of the times so wills it, those fearful commotions which were formerly called jacqueries, beside which purely political agitations are the merest child's play, which are no longer the conflict of the oppressed and the oppressor, but the revolt of discomfort against comfort. Then everything crumbles.

Jacqueries are earthquakes of the people.

It is this peril, possibly imminent towards the close of the eighteenth century, which the French Revolution, that immense act of probity, cut short.


... is the part I assume you mean. The Jacquerie, in specific, is a peasant uprising from 1358. But in French, the term can also be used to mean just a peasant uprising. What's considered to be the last major jacquerie revolt took place in 1707.

So what Hugo essentially is doing here is marking the difference between a peasant revolt - grab your pitchforks, let's storm the castle! - and a revolution, which comes with planning and strategy and creating something new from what's been torn down rather than just causing a violent fuss and not necessarily accomplishing anything.

Which is to say, what Gervais said but with more words.
"Quand vous aurez besoin de Bahorel, capitaine, Bahorel est là! Je sais faire trébucher tous les chevaux du garde-corps avec une ficelle... Rien qu'une petite ficelle. Enfin, pensez à Bahorel du Café Musain!"

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Gervais
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Re: Question: Jacquerie vs. Revolution?

Postby Gervais » Sat Mar 30, 2013 11:26 pm

More words are always good. :wink: For even more words for the same thing: Basically, a planned uprising--there is a goal, there is a will, there is a way--is Hugo's definition of Revolution, and "DOWN WITH BIG BROTHER!!!!! *charges*" without much of a goal, will or way (or just lacking the "way") is Jacquerie.
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"The peas, Woyzeck. The PEAS."

un_nuage_traversant
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Re: Question: Jacquerie vs. Revolution?

Postby un_nuage_traversant » Sun Mar 31, 2013 3:35 am

Ah! Thank you all!!! That really helped!


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