Honoré Daumier

Any research done in relation to the period of Les Misérables, whether for fanfiction or fanart purposes or otherwise.
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Col.Despard
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Honoré Daumier

Postby Col.Despard » Sun Dec 05, 2010 11:12 am

I am having a total Daumier gluttony session here - have marked down umpteen books I need to buy on his work. We'd all be familiar with these...

Gargantua, featuring Pear Head himself in 1832:

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The famous rue Transonain image of the massacre committed by the National Guard in the 1834 insurrection:

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And of course this painting (hrm...1860s students looking rather familiar...)

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Have a look at this one:

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"A Modern Galileo — And Still it Moves"
Dated 1834, it's a Republican who won't renounce his views.

Then there are the caricatures of doctors, students, artists, dandies...have been going through them and picking out Les Mis caricatures (found one I swear is a married Courfeyrac, with kiddies swarming all over him...)
"The principles of freedom, of humanity, and of justice, will finally triumph over falsehood, tyranny and delusion, and every principle inimical to the interests of the human race" - Edward Despard, 1803
http://coloneldespard.deviantart.com/

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Frédérique
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Re: Honoré Daumier

Postby Frédérique » Sun Dec 05, 2010 11:29 am

Daumier!! That last one is lovely.
There is an excellent one showing 1830 martyrs climbing out of their graves and seeing a sort of stand-in July Column and commenting how it was really worth getting killed for that (not as in 'oh, dying for your ideals is only cool if you succeed in the process' but as in 'and we are honoured as the martyrs who made this, the July Monarchy, possible? great') ... I'll post it when I find it.

ETA: here it is! Featuring both middle- and working class insurgents.

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Aurelia Combeferre
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Re: Honoré Daumier

Postby Aurelia Combeferre » Sun Dec 05, 2010 2:58 pm

I could squee all night! I particularly like your find, Frederique. :D
"...all aptitudes having equal opportunity; politically, all votes having equal weight; religiously, all consciences having equal rights."

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Frédérique
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Re: Honoré Daumier

Postby Frédérique » Sun Dec 05, 2010 3:26 pm

:D

There's such an enormous variety, from the adorable -

A Way of Using the Skirts Recently Come into Fashion

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to the thoroughly grim.

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*coughs*

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MmeBahorel
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Re: Honoré Daumier

Postby MmeBahorel » Sun Dec 05, 2010 4:32 pm

"The Uprising" lives here in DC - and yes, it is awesome in real life. Particularly because it's displayed in the music room at the Phillips. The Phillips Collection is Mr Phillips' collection of art, in his house (and two other houses), and the music room is all this dark paneling in a neogothic style (I'm sort of making that up, but it's close). And a very fancily decorated piano. So wham, right in the middle of it, we have Daumier's "Uprising".

(Trying to find pictures: here's one set up for a reception, this is a corner - to your left in the first picture, I think, slightly different reception set-up - in this one, you see an edge of the frame, here's a close-up in situ, and here you can see a little more of the room.)
What kind of literature and what kind of life is the same question. - Tom Stoppard

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between4walls
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Re: Honoré Daumier

Postby between4walls » Sun Nov 13, 2011 2:40 am

Today's New York Times column on excessive reactions to political cartoons is illustrated with Daumier's Gargantua.
Here day embraces night, and says: I will die with you and you will be reborn with me. From the heavy embrace of all desolations springs faith.

The real name of devotion is disinterestedness.

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between4walls
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Re: Honoré Daumier

Postby between4walls » Thu Jan 02, 2014 6:27 am

I just wanted to tell everyone about the current exhibition on Honore Daumier at the Royal Academy of Arts in London, which I was lucky enough to see recently.

It has the Gargantua and Rue Transnonain cartoons, as well as one of July Monarchy politicians washing the tricolor's colors out, one of women protesting in 1848 in favor the right to divorce, and several from the late Second Empire period, mostly dealing with the international situation (eg mocking the idea that "L'empire, c'est la paix."). One (of the Grim Reaper on a train) had the censor's markings on it, rejecting two proposed captions. Many warned of the precarious international situation, eg one showed Diplomacy as an old woman trying and failing to pose as the Colossus of Rhodes between Italy and Turkey, another showed Europe as suspended on a single bayonet for balance. There was also a great cartoon of the first aerial photograph, with the punning caption "Nadar elevates photography to the height of art."

It also had some of his paintings- other than the late ones I didn't much like them, but they were interesting for his obsession with Don Quixote.

I also learned from the exhibit about his involvement in the Commune as a delegate on culture (I think that was it?) and objections to getting rid of the Vendome Column.

Zola's novel of the Franco-Prussian war and the Commune, The Debacle, was in the gift shop, but I couldn't justify buying it. First time I've seen it on sale, though.

Anyway, if you are in or near London soon, check this out- it ends 26th January.
Here day embraces night, and says: I will die with you and you will be reborn with me. From the heavy embrace of all desolations springs faith.

The real name of devotion is disinterestedness.


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