Appreciating Charles Dickens

Discussion on any 19th century written works by authors other than Hugo.
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silverwhistle
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Re: Appreciating Charles Dickens

Postby silverwhistle » Wed Aug 11, 2010 12:23 am

MmeJavert wrote:I don't think I've ever liked his women characters either, with the possible exception of Madame Defarge. And even she is annoying at times.

Yes: his women are generally awful. Thérèse Defarge is one who could have had potential if he'd made more of her as the tragic heroine: an initially good woman who lets what began as an understandable grievance overwhelm and destroy her and those around her as she becomes increasingly obsessed with vengeance. Instead, there's so much of the soppy Lucie plotline…

Dickens's humour hasn't worn well, either. He's just not as good as his French and Russian contemporaries: not as grown-up.
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Phan_in_Mizland
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Re: Appreciating Charles Dickens

Postby Phan_in_Mizland » Sun Aug 07, 2011 5:58 am

I LOVE Dickens! Like, I love him. Sydney Carton <3. And yes, he does remind me of Grantaire.

I've only read "A Christmas Carol" and "Tale of Two Cities" but I own "Great Expectations" and plan to read it soon.

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MmeFeuilly
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Re: Appreciating Charles Dickens

Postby MmeFeuilly » Tue Dec 20, 2011 5:15 am

I've barely read any of his stuff, if I'm being honest, however, since it's that time of year, has anyone read The Goblins Who Stole a Sextan? It's my favourite Christmas story.
If you haven't read it, I recommend it... Here, I'll even make it easy for you!
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morgan le fay
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Re: Appreciating Charles Dickens

Postby morgan le fay » Tue Dec 20, 2011 12:38 pm

I adore Dickens! His writing style is unique, and he was perhaps the first writer in english to create a novel that switches between both person and tenses (Bleak House). His fascinating and beautiful; both the language and the themes.

@ silverwhistle, I don't think Dickens' humour has decreased at all over time. His novels are still laugh-out-loud hilarious, and his mastery of using clichés in a completely original and brilliant way - challenging himself as narrator over their meaning and usage - cannot lose its amusement value.

Yes, Dickens may not seem as 'grown-up' as some of his continental contemporaries; but he studies many of the same ideas as them, in a different way. Dickens was writing for a mass audience in his periodicals; while many French and Russian writers of the time were aiming for a smaller, more educated fraction of the populace. And, much as I love him, it would be an awful thing if all 19th century novels we're like those of Hugo.

I agree about the women though. There is some rather creepy stuff in some of his books...

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Re: Appreciating Charles Dickens

Postby YoungStudentMarius » Thu Jan 09, 2014 11:07 pm

I'd just like to say that I just finished reading David Copperfield for the first time, and really loved it, and am starting Bleak House and a biography on Dickens, so if anyone's read either of those, and is interested in discussing, or anything...well, maybe this thread needs a revival.
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Re: Appreciating Charles Dickens

Postby deHavilland » Thu Jan 09, 2014 11:10 pm

I was just saying to Acaila the other day that while I usually find Charles Dickens intolerable, David Copperfield is one of the few that I legitimately enjoy. I find it very strong in the array of characters that he presents us with, but Marius, may I present you with inarguably the best film version to exist?

(Not going to lie, this childhood favorite may in fact be why I like David Copperfield so much. See if you can identify where it deviates from the real thing.)
"Quand vous aurez besoin de Bahorel, capitaine, Bahorel est là! Je sais faire trébucher tous les chevaux du garde-corps avec une ficelle... Rien qu'une petite ficelle. Enfin, pensez à Bahorel du Café Musain!"

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Re: Appreciating Charles Dickens

Postby YoungStudentMarius » Thu Jan 09, 2014 11:47 pm

It really is, and there's something about all of them that feel...I don't know, but it's the first book I can remember actually being able to navigate through all the houses and everything in them in my head without getting hopelessly lost.

....Oh my. I'm fairly certain you're right. I think I love it already. :wink:
(Also, just saying Murdstone's beard really does look exactly how I pictured it).
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Re: Appreciating Charles Dickens

Postby MmeBahorel » Fri Jan 10, 2014 1:35 am

Bleak House! One of my favourites. It has everything: romance of varying sorts, a mystery, a look at the highest and lowest classes, and gay. (Sergeant George/Phil is canon and I won't hear different.)
What kind of literature and what kind of life is the same question. - Tom Stoppard

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Re: Appreciating Charles Dickens

Postby humanracer » Mon Jan 13, 2014 7:14 pm

I find Dickens prose to be quite longwinded. That said I enjoyed Great Expectations and Bleak House. My main issue with Dickens is his morals. I think the way he treated his wife was totally reprehensible. He also viewed his children as nothing more than a drain on his resources. Authors like Hugo and Dumas were no saints of course but they appeared to have much more affection for their family.

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Re: Appreciating Charles Dickens

Postby humanracer » Mon Jan 13, 2014 7:17 pm

deHavilland wrote:I was just saying to Acaila the other day that while I usually find Charles Dickens intolerable, David Copperfield is one of the few that I legitimately enjoy. I find it very strong in the array of characters that he presents us with, but Marius, may I present you with inarguably the best film version to exist?

(Not going to lie, this childhood favorite may in fact be why I like David Copperfield so much. See if you can identify where it deviates from the real thing.)


I know quite a few people who got into the story from that adaptation. DC is generally regarded as Dickens best novel. I have to admit though I have still to read it.

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Re: Appreciating Charles Dickens

Postby deHavilland » Tue Jan 14, 2014 2:44 am

humanracer wrote:
deHavilland wrote:(Not going to lie, this childhood favorite may in fact be why I like David Copperfield so much. See if you can identify where it deviates from the real thing.)


I know quite a few people who got into the story from that adaptation. DC is generally regarded as Dickens best novel. I have to admit though I have still to read it.


I think it's the Cheese Monster that does it. Boy, was I disappointed when I finally read the novel. ;)
"Quand vous aurez besoin de Bahorel, capitaine, Bahorel est là! Je sais faire trébucher tous les chevaux du garde-corps avec une ficelle... Rien qu'une petite ficelle. Enfin, pensez à Bahorel du Café Musain!"

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CC21106
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Re: Appreciating Charles Dickens

Postby CC21106 » Thu Oct 13, 2016 10:25 pm

MmeBahorel wrote:Bleak House! One of my favourites. It has everything: romance of varying sorts, a mystery, a look at the highest and lowest classes, and gay. (Sergeant George/Phil is canon and I won't hear different.)

I liked it enough to read it twice, and think I will have another go at it.

And when jonesing for more French violence you can't do better than Tale of Two Cities.
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