Paul Adam's "Au soleil de juillet" - Amis cameos?

Discussion on any 19th century written works by authors other than Hugo.
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Paul Adam's "Au soleil de juillet" - Amis cameos?

Postby Frédérique » Fri Oct 30, 2009 6:11 pm

Ran a search through the forum, brought up a few Pauls and a few Adams, but nothing more - has anyone here read one/several/all parts of Paul Adam's "Le temps et la vie"? It seems to feature (apart from about five dozen Balzac characters), in its fourth and final volume ("Au soleil de juillet"), a fair number of our lads. According to this article:

Du côté de Victor Hugo [30], nous rencontrons Courfeyrac et Combeferre dès janvier 1830, chez Véry ; ils y ont rendez-vous avec Omer et son jeune beau-frère Urbain Gresloup, qui sortent d’« entendre la Malibran au Théâtre-Italien » (p. 183) [31] ; on les retrouve le même hiver à la Loge de l’Ardente-Amitié*, avec « Grantaire et Bahorel, les étudiants pauvres » (p. 194) et « le bel Enjolras à tête d’archange » (p. 195). Lorsque les journées de Juillet se déclenchent, tous reparaissent plusieurs fois, au gré des effets de groupes recherchés par l’auteur ; juste avant l’invasion du Louvre, Enjolras, Bahorel, Grantaire pressent Omer de se joindre à eux pour la République, s’il en est temps encore (p. 422) ; puis, vers la fin, ils s’effacent, engloutis dans l’échec, renvoyés après usage à leur « future » barricade de 1832...


(Very loosely: 'We encounter Courfeyrac and Combeferre from January 1830 on [plainly not true, see below], at Véry's; there they meet Omer [Héricourt, the hero] and his young brother-in-law [...]; we find them again that same winter at the Loge de l'Ardente-Amitié, with Grantaire and Bahorel, the poor students and the beautiful Enjolras with his archangel's face. As the July days unfold, all reappear multiple times [...]; just before the storming of the Louvre, Enjolras, Bahorel, and Grantaire press Omer to join them in the Republican cause [...]; towards the end, they disappear, devastated by the failure, sent back after use to their 'future' barricade of 1832 ...')

Interesting that Courfeyrac and Combeferre can't think of anything better to do with their money than to eat at Véry's (now we know what the former borrowed those sixty francs for!) ... and Grantaire is maybe being an actual help?

Anyhow! Is anyone acquainted with the work in question? Splendid? Miserable? Highs and lows?

The first and second parts, "La force" and "L'enfant d'Austerlitz", are available in French on Project Gutenberg and Wikisource respectively, the third and fourth, covering 1827-1820, don't exist anywhere on the internet as far as I've found, though Barnes & Noble appears to sell an ebook version of the latter digitalised from the original 1903 edition (presumably, then, there has never been a reprint?). Information on the man and his work seems rare as it is, but no other article but the one linked above even mentions that he populated his books with existent characters. (Though he was not writing straightforward sequels/gapfillers - crossover fanfiction, so to speak - but merely using them to illustrate the family history of his Héricourts. Still, it's noteworthy, isn't it?) The French Wikipedia article quotes Gourmont saying that there was something Balzacian about his prolificness, but neglecting to mention that in producing his work he has been feeding quite well off the fruits of B.'s own prolificness; the Hugo connection does not seem to have been explored at all. Or has Berthier's 2004 challenge - 'Avis aux hugoliens intéressés!' - found an answer by now? If so, where can it be found?

*Haha. (Blanqui is also encountered there.) Though going by Google the lodge in question was actually based in Rouen ... ? At any rate, the "Dictionnaire thématique du roman de mœurs, 1850-1914" sums up the entirety of "La ruse" (third part) as an 'evocation des milieux francs-maçons et carbonari à Paris sous le règne de Charles X.'.

Correction: "La ruse" is on Archive.org (and it isn't even riddled with '#'s, though it does spell C. & C. with Gs)! Already found les Amis. Combeferre is still reading Fourier and Saint-Simon, Prouvaire is a follower of Beccaria, Courfeyrac a 'doctrinaire' ... and Enjolras is 'bel', 'bel', 'bel'!

Correction #2: And Grantaire gets to sing "Vive Henri IV" and mention how he bought his Robespierre waistcoat especially to impress Enjolras. Well, or nearly. And by 'Enjolras' I mean 'Enjolras, qui sera un grand homme, presque aussi grand que ses cheveux ...' ('who will be a great man, almost as great as his hair'). I need this book.

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Postby merlin_emrys » Fri Oct 30, 2009 7:48 pm

Oh my! I have never read the work but that is quite the discovery. Well done on finding it.

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Postby Frédérique » Fri Oct 30, 2009 8:08 pm

It is either absurdly obscure or I am overlooking the glaring mistake I'm making in searching for information about it. It seems entertaning to say the least. Balzac's great literary genius (later politician) d'Arthez makes one appearance as a short, 'very hairy' (or does that just mean 'with very full hair'? the word is 'chevelu') man who literally says nothing but 'I'm a royalist, I am called Daniel d'Arthez, I don't share any of your ideas, but I respect them, and most of all I respect your courage. That is all I wanted to say.'. And then he's gone again. What the heck.

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Postby Col.Despard » Sat Oct 31, 2009 3:33 am

le bel Enjolras à tête d’archange

Eeeeee!

This must be investigated! Want!
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Postby MmeBahorel » Sat Oct 31, 2009 4:29 am

presque aussi grand que ses cheveux


Is Elyse's prof the reincarnation of this guy?

(I'm cracking up so hard because of the awesomeness, really.)
What kind of literature and what kind of life is the same question. - Tom Stoppard

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Postby a_marguerite » Sat Oct 31, 2009 10:46 am

MmeBahorel wrote:
presque aussi grand que ses cheveux


Is Elyse's prof the reincarnation of this guy?



BWAHAHAHAHAHA.

lol, Paul Adams was a turn of the century fic writer. I need to read his stuff when I get the time. Especially since he's got Amis running around all over the place. :D

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Postby Frédérique » Sat Oct 31, 2009 11:41 am

Well, he lets Grantaire say it, but there remains a distinct possibility :D

Context:
Monsieur Héricourt, je pêche dans vos eaux ... l'ablette et le brochet ont des torts l'un et l'autre. A cette heure, mon ami Enjolras, ce grand là-bas, prétend qu'il faut retirer l'ablette de l'estomac du brochet. J'ai donc acheté un gilet à la Robespierre avec des pointes ... Mais quand les ablettes auront chassé le brochet? ... Il y aura bien quelque autre gros poisson qui mangera les ablettes. Et je serai forcé d'acheter un bonnet phrygien ou une carmagnole pour sauver les petites bêtes. Enjolras, qui sera un grand homme, presque aussi grand que ses cheveux, ne se doute pas des frais de garde-robe qu'il impose à ses amis.


(again, loosely, for the not-at-all francophone '... I am fishing in your waters ... the whiting and the pickerel are both in the wrong. At this hour, my friend Enjolras, the tall one down there, claims that one must pull the whiting back out of the pickerel's stomach. So I bought a Robespierre waistcoat with points/dots/?! ... but once the whitings have chased away the pickerel? There will be some other big fish to eat the whitings. And I shall be forced to purchase a Phrygian cap or a a carmagnole to save the little beasts. Enjolras, who will be a great man, almost as great as his hair, has no idea of the expenses he imposes on his friends when it comes to clothing.')

I think it's actually got Courfeyrac as a vague semblance of a Fourierist, but it may just look that way because he goes on talking about not fighting one's passions right after it's said that 'les fourriéristes entouraient l'oncle Edme' (Edme Lyrisse, who is apparently some sort of Bonapartist conspirator, part-time Republican, and general mischief-plotter recurring in the books; apparently, too, he escaped from prison and ran around Italy and Spain for a while, so he's probably personally acquainted with at least ten characters originally inspired by Vidocq).
He does so 'en se dressant tel un coq dans un beau frac bleu à boutons d'or; les manches, étrécies au poignet, lui couvraient encore les premières phalanges, par-dessus la baptiste plissée de sa manchette, et des joyaux brillaient au bout de ses gestes enthousiastes' ('... in a beautiful blue frock coat with golden buttons; the sleeves, tight around the wrists, still covered the first phalanx, above the pleated batiste of his cuff ...'); evidently another of the expensive outfits demanded by the inconsiderate Enjolras!

There's someone who might or might not be Marius - student, pale, black-haired, vaguely girly, goes around with 'l'enthousiasme des batailles rêvées' on his face, climbs a table amidst general Republican enthusiasm to exclaim 'Vive le Roi de Rome! Gloire aux aigles! Vivent les héros d'Austerlitz!' ... but he is too well-dressed (maybe the author was just a fashion fiend), so perhaps in the context of the whole it's clear that it's somebody else.

The whole capital-Cs-as-Gs thing in that file (Gourfeyrac, Gombeferre and Ghrestien go to the Ghaumière! well, they don't, but--) is somewhat unnerving, though. One suspects that Joly transcripted it on a cold day.
I'm tempted to sign up with B&N to see if their 'free ebook' offer is real and doesn't entail anything else, because for all the strange developments in characterisation (Gombeferre is a dandy!), it's still highly entertaining.

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Postby MmeBahorel » Sat Oct 31, 2009 4:34 pm

OMG this is awesome. Possibly because Combeferre is a dandy. M. Adam *really* likes clothes, I think.
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Postby Col.Despard » Mon Nov 02, 2009 9:05 pm

'Kay, the hair thing is getting disconcerting now...

I am so there for the fashion and hair. These are the essentials of the period.
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Postby a_marguerite » Mon Nov 02, 2009 10:28 pm

Hahaha, I love how dandyish they all are. Enjolras won't be satisfied changing the moral fabric of France, he has to change the actual fabrics too.

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Postby Marianne » Tue Nov 03, 2009 2:40 am

a_marguerite wrote:Hahaha, I love how dandyish they all are. Enjolras won't be satisfied changing the moral fabric of France, he has to change the actual fabrics too.


Goddammit, you owe me a new keyboard, this one now has pretzel crumbs sprayed all over it from an untimely burst of laughter.
[Dieu] entend ta voix, ô fille des hommes! aussi bien que celle des constellations; car rien n'est petit pour celui devant lequel rien n'est grand.
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Postby MmeBahorel » Tue Nov 03, 2009 3:15 am

And that is why the lord created men!
What kind of literature and what kind of life is the same question. - Tom Stoppard

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Postby MmeJavert » Tue Nov 03, 2009 3:16 am

I think I love you all. <3
and to this day, she's glided on
always home but so far away
like a word misplaced
nothing said, what a waste

~pearl jam, "dissident"

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Postby Frédérique » Thu Nov 05, 2009 10:47 am

Oh, he does. Like clothes. He leaves no doubts as to what anyone noteworthy is wearing (Bahorel - 'I can make all the horses of the Guard trip and stumble with a piece of string ... just a little piece of string' - has a 'greenish frock coat'). That must be why there is so little of Prouvaire - he must have known that if he had given him a scene he would not have been able to stop himself from giving a page-length description of all components of his outfit in fabric, cut, colour, pattern, decade of origin/inspiration ...

... though I'm not sure what he means to suggest when he points out that all of Enjolras' gang are beardless and in very tight trousers. (It's a strange picture all in all: 'Le bel adolescent, sûr de lui, poussait, l'un après l'autre, devant le capitaine, ses compagnons imberbes en culottes collantes; ils se courbaient sous leurs chevelures onduleuses.' They do what? They bend under their wavy hair?!)

Tragically, E. has to share the attribute 'farouche' with Michel Chrestien now. (But the latter is also said to be 'pudgy' twice within five lines or so.)

Combeferre le dandy (at this point being described as 'l'élégant M. Gombeferre') briefly addresses the protagonist later on praising a prosopopeia of/on (?) the Law he made (found earlier in the text) which impressed Combeferre so much he went talk to Destutt de Tracy about it (!!), who is now going to give a lecture on the same subject. He then switches the topic to point out that The Good Must Be Innocent, etc., and that only laws can protect them from themselves after their victory, to which Enjolras (elbows on the table) points out that said victory has to be achieved first. He (E.) then underlines his statement by tapping on his lighter (?) while lighting a pipe. I don't quite see Enjolras as a smoker (though it is an enjoyment that is relatively easy to be severe in), but then, I don't quite see him referring to a fire that will 'devour the impurity of the world', either ... (do enjoy his professed ambition to restart the history of France from August 10, 1792 onwards). He is also unable to keep himself from smiling at an excessively charming commissaire.
Gombeferre, meanwhile, ever concerned with the health of his fellow-creatures', is next seen smiling at grisettes who suffer from painful spasmes d'hilarité.
Courfeyrac (also known as Gourbeyrac) does impersonations of Charles X. in the street for the amusement of the passersby (whenever he isn't at the opera with Combeferre, that is) ... I think. Possibly. And Bahorel is hanging out with the Freemasons.

It turned out the Barnes & Nobles free ebooks 'only ship to US addresses'. How can ebooks ship to addresses? Ah well. A curious fact that possibly makes up for the lack of Feuilly: when I optimistically put "au soleil de juillet" through my local Amazon's search, it rewarded me with "God's Playground - A History of Poland. Vol. 2: 1795 to the Present".

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Postby Col.Despard » Thu Nov 05, 2009 11:59 am

OMSB...I'm laughing so hard here I think I'm actually feeling a bit ill through clenched stomach muscles!

I'm sort of seeing an ABC society as viewed through a non-Hugoesque perspective. Hugo sees the heroics. Adams evidently sees the tight pants and fabulous, fabulous hair. Just because Hugo doesn't mention it, doesn't mean that Combeferre isn't a dandy! He can be a Man For All Seasons, including the prevailing fashions for winter, fall, spring and summer. And Enjolras lighting up...well....yes, I can see this listed under "Hobbies," alongside flagwaving and singing patriotic songs. Elbows on the table - nice touch - and the Sewardesque moment of "we will wrap the world in flames!" Smiling at a charming commissaire...ha! A thousand fangirls chorus "we knew it!!!!" And so admirably practical in his ambitions. Let's start at the year 0! Again!

Courfeyrac, even with Joly's head cold pronunciation, actually sounds deliciously in character. And Bahorel is clearly looking for Prouvaire.
"The principles of freedom, of humanity, and of justice, will finally triumph over falsehood, tyranny and delusion, and every principle inimical to the interests of the human race" - Edward Despard, 1803

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