Lines I like

Any discussion related to Victor's Hugo's Les Misérables, in any language.
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CC21106
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Lines I like

Postby CC21106 » Sun Dec 11, 2016 8:02 pm

There may be a topic on this somewhere, but I did not see one, as there are about a million topics and I am new.

Lines I like:
"You're an idiot." --M. Gillenormand to Lt. Theodule, who has been sucking up to him for an hour.

"Who has not said to a cat, are you coming in?"

“Marius!” cried the old man. “Marius! My little Marius! my child! my well-beloved son! You open your eyes, you gaze upon me, you are alive, merci!”

And this bit of dialogue:
[Mother Superior:] “No other man than you can or must enter that chamber. See to that. A fine sight it would be, to see a man enter the dead-room!”
[Fauchelevent:]“More often!”
“Hey?”
“More often!”
“What do you say?”
“I say more often.”
“More often than what?”
“Reverend Mother, I did not say more often than what, I said more often.”
“I don’t understand you. Why do you say more often?”
“In order to speak like you, reverend Mother.”
“But I did not say ‘more often.’”
At that moment, nine o’clock struck.
“At nine o’clock in the morning and at all hours, praised and adored be the most Holy Sacrament of the altar,” said the prioress.
“Amen,” said Fauchelevent.
The clock struck opportunely. It cut “more often” short. It is probable, that had it not been for this, the prioress and Fauchelevent would never have unravelled that skein.

And I like the stories the little girls tell each other. Hugo had been listening to real children.
Don't mess with Texas! We mess up enough by ourselves.
I have actually made bullets like they're doing in my avatar. Then loaded the gun with a ramrod, and shot it. But I'm not feeling real good about guns right now.

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Acaila
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Re: Lines I like

Postby Acaila » Sun Dec 11, 2016 8:09 pm

My boyfriend got me a necklace with the quote "Not being heard is no reason for staying silent", and I feel like that is the most me quote on so many levels.

This quote used to be in the London programmes and I've always loved it even though I'm not sure where in the Brick it's from:
“Should we continue to look upwards? Is the light we can see in the sky one of those which will presently be extinguished? The ideal is terrifying to behold... brilliant but threatened on all sides by the dark forces that surround it: nevertheless, no more in danger than a star in the jaws of the clouds.”

The quote that always makes me just throw down my Brick and FEEL is:
“In the future no man will slay his fellow, the earth will be radiant, the human race will love. It will come, citizens, that day when all shall be concord, harmony, light, joy, and life; it will come, and it is so that it may come that we are going to die.”
Revolution: like Christmas come early only with more death
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"Les Amis Fun Package - The Awesome Traits of Each"
"She's basically Enjolras meets Amy Pond"
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Re: Lines I like

Postby CC21106 » Sun Dec 11, 2016 11:46 pm

Acaila wrote:"Not being heard is no reason for staying silent"

Good one for the present day.
Don't mess with Texas! We mess up enough by ourselves.
I have actually made bullets like they're doing in my avatar. Then loaded the gun with a ramrod, and shot it. But I'm not feeling real good about guns right now.

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Re: Lines I like

Postby Acaila » Mon Dec 12, 2016 12:24 am

Indeed! I always wear it if I'm doing something that involves being really assertive and righteous!
Revolution: like Christmas come early only with more death
Abaisse Chief/Chef
"Les Amis Fun Package - The Awesome Traits of Each"
"She's basically Enjolras meets Amy Pond"
Sings Stars "way better than Russel Crowe"

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CC21106
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Re: Lines I like

Postby CC21106 » Mon Dec 12, 2016 1:51 am

Acaila wrote:Indeed! I always wear it if I'm doing something that involves being really assertive and righteous!

I may steal that idea. In the online edition it's "That one is not listened to is no reason for preserving silence" but yours is better. More succinct, bit of a different connotation, fits different situations better. What translation is it?
Don't mess with Texas! We mess up enough by ourselves.
I have actually made bullets like they're doing in my avatar. Then loaded the gun with a ramrod, and shot it. But I'm not feeling real good about guns right now.

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Re: Lines I like

Postby 23623 » Mon Dec 12, 2016 6:37 am

Crazy Gillenormand fangirl checking in! Thank you so much for starting this, CC. Don't have the book at hand but I'll add more next time. For now I just have to jump in and say that Gillenormand is absolutely the coolest grandpa ever. 8) I LOVE his chapters. His relationship with Marius is so realistic and so interesting. They have radically different political views, they can't live under the same roof, they can't even talk normally with each other, but Gillenormand really LOVES Marius. I dare say he would still love him even if Marius were the most wanted criminal in France. But Gillenormand's parenting is epic fail. I actually find him rather manipulative and authoritative as a parent. :| He just can't find a proper way to channel his love to his dear grandson. He fails to really understand him because there's so much miscommuication between grandpa and grandson. He's like those parents who think the youth nowdays seriously suck. :lol: I guess in his eyes Marius is just like a child who is lost in the wood, and he'll do everything to "save" him from whatever he's doing wrong. Gillenormand expresses his feelings openly for the first time when Marius is wounded. I was really moved when I read that chapter. :cry: I've watched a Spanish TV adaption of LM (it has a thread in the movie section) and that scene was totally amazing. I actually cried while watching even though I couldn't fully understand the lines!

For the barricade part, I really enjoy the Courfish jokes. He's like the Percy Blakeney of Les Amis. :lol: And when Mabeuf meets Courfeyrac before joining the barricade, he's like "hey, dude, a barricade? Cool, I'm in, let's go!" I find it rather adorable. What happens next kind of punches me right in the face though. Seems that I have a thing for cool old fellows, lol.

I also love Javert's final note to his colleagues before suicide because this is just so JAVERT. I don't think in the musical Javert getting so emotional before suicide is really in character, but it works well. Still, I'd really love to see an adaption in which Javert does what he does in the book.
Revolution, but civilization

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Re: Lines I like

Postby CC21106 » Mon Dec 12, 2016 4:11 pm

23623 wrote:Crazy Gillenormand fangirl checking in! Thank you so much for starting this, CC. Don't have the book at hand but I'll add more next time. For now I just have to jump in and say that Gillenormand is absolutely the coolest grandpa ever. 8) I LOVE his chapters. His relationship with Marius is so realistic and so interesting. They have radically different political views, they can't live under the same roof, they can't even talk normally with each other, but Gillenormand really LOVES Marius. I dare say he would still love him even if Marius were the most wanted criminal in France. But Gillenormand's parenting is epic fail.

It sure is! To the point where Marius storms out of the house at age 17! But they are both such stiffnecked people and won't back down an inch. Marius won't even take the money from his aunt. More alike than they realize.
I actually find him rather manipulative and authoritative as a parent. :| He just can't find a proper way to channel his love to his dear grandson. He fails to really understand him because there's so much miscommuication between grandpa and grandson. He's like those parents who think the youth nowdays seriously suck. :lol: I guess in his eyes Marius is just like a child who is lost in the wood, and he'll do everything to "save" him from whatever he's doing wrong. Gillenormand expresses his feelings openly for the first time when Marius is wounded. I was really moved when I read that chapter. :cry: I've watched a Spanish TV adaption of LM (it has a thread in the movie section) and that scene was totally amazing. I actually cried while watching even though I couldn't fully understand the lines!
I'll have to look up that adaptation.

I also like the Gillenormand bit where he's trying to get along with Marius by not denouncing the revolutionaries of the French Revolution:

You have called me ‘father’ three times, and it is worth it. I will attend to it. She shall be brought hither. Agreed, I tell you. It has already been put into verse. This is the ending of the elegy of the ‘Jeune Malade’ by André Chénier, by André Chénier whose throat was cut by the ras . . . by the giants of ‘93.”
M. Gillenormand fancied that he detected a faint frown on the part of Marius, who, in truth, as we must admit, was no longer listening to him, and who was thinking far more of Cosette than of 1793.
The grandfather, trembling at having so inopportunely introduced André Chénier, resumed precipitately:
“Cut his throat is not the word. The fact is that the great revolutionary geniuses, who were not malicious, that is incontestable, who were heroes, pardi! found that André Chénier embarrassed them somewhat, and they had him guillot . . . that is to say, those great men on the 7th of Thermidor, besought André Chénier, in the interests of public safety, to be so good as to go....” [....]

[And he just can't stand it and goes and explodes at his valet]

He seized Basque by the collar, and shouted full in his face in fury:—“By the hundred thousand Javottes of the devil, those ruffians did assassinate him!”
“Who, sir?”
“André Chénier!”
“Yes, sir,” said Basque in alarm.

Seems that I have a thing for cool old fellows, lol.
I loved Mabeuf too and was so sad when he had to sell his books and especially the copperplates for his own book. :(

I I also love Javert's final note to his colleagues before suicide because this is just so JAVERT.

Me, too. It's too bad that his colleagues think it's a sign of madness. His note makes perfect sense. Of course he doesn't explain why he thinks the gendarmes need a backup while trailing somebody.
Don't mess with Texas! We mess up enough by ourselves.
I have actually made bullets like they're doing in my avatar. Then loaded the gun with a ramrod, and shot it. But I'm not feeling real good about guns right now.

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Re: Lines I like

Postby Acaila » Mon Dec 12, 2016 10:06 pm

CC21106 wrote:
Acaila wrote:Indeed! I always wear it if I'm doing something that involves being really assertive and righteous!

I may steal that idea. In the online edition it's "That one is not listened to is no reason for preserving silence" but yours is better. More succinct, bit of a different connotation, fits different situations better. What translation is it?


Not sure I'm afraid. I'm not even that sure where in the Brick it comes from, or I could go and check it against my translations.
Revolution: like Christmas come early only with more death
Abaisse Chief/Chef
"Les Amis Fun Package - The Awesome Traits of Each"
"She's basically Enjolras meets Amy Pond"
Sings Stars "way better than Russel Crowe"

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Re: Lines I like

Postby deHavilland » Tue Dec 13, 2016 4:42 am

Did somebody say TRANSLATION?

Swooping in to ruin everyone's day, the line isn't "Not being heard is no reason for staying silent" in any translation! (Except possibly the Denny or the Rose, neither of which I bothered to check, but if I recall correctly the necklace predates the Rose and no one likes Denny anyway.) The Hapgood, as CC already mentioned has it as "that one is not listened to is no reason for preserving silence" and Wraxall has it as "not to be heard is no reason why a man should hold his tongue."

The closest version appears in the Wilbour and the F/M and it's "not being heard is no reason for silence."

But the line is sort of saved by the original text. "N'être pas écouté, ce n'est pas une raison pour se taire." Because "se taire" is a verb meaning to silence oneself (or just to be quiet), you could translate it with more motion as "Not being heard is is not a reason to be silent" which could be considered closer to the use of a verb in "staying silent" as opposed to just a noun: "silence."

(Also, please note when looking at the original text what a hack Wraxall sometimes is as a translator. I don't see any mention of tongues, Wraxall.)
"Quand vous aurez besoin de Bahorel, capitaine, Bahorel est là! Je sais faire trébucher tous les chevaux du garde-corps avec une ficelle... Rien qu'une petite ficelle. Enfin, pensez à Bahorel du Café Musain!"

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Re: Lines I like

Postby Acaila » Thu Dec 15, 2016 12:19 am

It's like he's trying to insert idioms where there are none!
Revolution: like Christmas come early only with more death
Abaisse Chief/Chef
"Les Amis Fun Package - The Awesome Traits of Each"
"She's basically Enjolras meets Amy Pond"
Sings Stars "way better than Russel Crowe"

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Re: Lines I like

Postby CC21106 » Thu Dec 15, 2016 3:16 am

English just doesn't have a good one-word way to say to be quiet. *To silent. You can say to quiet but it means something different and is always transitive. To quiet someone or to silence someone neither one means the same as for them to be quiet and they mean different things.
"I'm going to be quiet" is the best possible way to say that--or "remain silent," to get fancy or legal sounding.
I've never heard anybody say "hold your tongue" in my life, though I remember reading it as a very small child and getting a curious mental image.
N'être pas écouté, ce n'est pas une raison pour se taire--As a non French speaker with 3 years of Latin in my distant past I think I see a couple of infinitives in there. Our friend Google renders it "Not being listened to, that's not a reason to be silent." "Not being heard is no reason to be silent" is how I'd clean that up. Google is right that "being" sounds better than the literal "to be" in this sentence.

It's a good sentiment no matter how it's said and it appears in compendiums of quotes, as a quick search reveals. It even gets its own poster: https://s-media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com/236x/b0/50/5b/b0505bc72874635ee497b7d915f3434c.jpg
Don't mess with Texas! We mess up enough by ourselves.
I have actually made bullets like they're doing in my avatar. Then loaded the gun with a ramrod, and shot it. But I'm not feeling real good about guns right now.

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Re: Lines I like

Postby deHavilland » Thu Dec 15, 2016 3:28 am

Personally, I'm down for the sharp "Hsht!" You have to start with the h sound so that when the curmudgeonly grips** accuse you of shushing them, you can legally say that you did not say "shh."

We have a lot of good ways to tell someone to be quiet, but there's no specific verb to describe the action. Instead we use "to be" and then silent or quiet as an adjective/state of being. Whereas "(se) taire" is a pronominal verb that literally means just that in one word. Similarly, I came across a good Swedish one today: "blunda." "Att blunda" is "to close your eyes." Love it.

**Havvy works in film and often has to tell the curmudgeonly grips to be quiet while we are rolling and has developed a great number of sound effects and hand gestures to this end.
"Quand vous aurez besoin de Bahorel, capitaine, Bahorel est là! Je sais faire trébucher tous les chevaux du garde-corps avec une ficelle... Rien qu'une petite ficelle. Enfin, pensez à Bahorel du Café Musain!"

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CC21106
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Re: Lines I like

Postby CC21106 » Thu Dec 15, 2016 5:28 am

There's also (not for when filming though) "SSSSSILENCE!!"
Don't mess with Texas! We mess up enough by ourselves.
I have actually made bullets like they're doing in my avatar. Then loaded the gun with a ramrod, and shot it. But I'm not feeling real good about guns right now.

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Acaila
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Re: Lines I like

Postby Acaila » Thu Dec 15, 2016 11:05 pm

Or in Scotland, WHEESHT! :D
Revolution: like Christmas come early only with more death
Abaisse Chief/Chef
"Les Amis Fun Package - The Awesome Traits of Each"
"She's basically Enjolras meets Amy Pond"
Sings Stars "way better than Russel Crowe"

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Re: Lines I like

Postby 23623 » Wed Dec 28, 2016 3:34 am

Not sure where to put it and apologize if it's off topic. Just watched the movie "Hacksaw Ridge". For those who haven't seen it yet...it's about a guy who joins the army to serve his country but doesn't want to kill anyone. While watching the movie I couldn't help thinking "OMG this guy must be a reincarnation of Valjean and Combeferre!" :shock: So I decide to bring this question up: what do you think of violence? Is it sort of necessary evil? Is there any valid justification of violence (e.g. violence used to do good is not downright evil by nature)?

I had been thinking about this last time I read the book:
"What a pity!" said Combeferre. "What hideous things these butcheries are! Come, when there are no more kings, there will be no more war. En- jolras, you are taking aim at that sergeant, you are not looking at him. Fancy, he is a charming young man; he is intrepid; it is evident that he is thoughtful; those young artillery-men are very well educated; he has a father, a mother, a family; he is probably in love; he is not more than five and twenty at the most; he might be your brother."
"He is," said Enjolras.
"Yes," replied Combeferre, "he is mine too. Well, let us not kill him." "Let me alone. It must be done."
And a tear trickled slowly down Enjolras' marble cheek.
At the same moment, he pressed the trigger of his rifle. The flame leaped forth.


Without saying a word, he took aim at the fireman, and, a second later, the helmet, smashed by a bullet, rattled noisily into the street. The terri- fied soldier made haste to disappear. A second observer took his place. This one was an officer. Jean Valjean, who had re-loaded his gun, took aim at the newcomer and sent the officer's casque to join the soldier's. The officer did not persist, and retired speedily. This time the warning was understood. No one made his appearance thereafter on that roof; and the idea of spying on the barricade was abandoned.
"Why did you not kill the man?" Bossuet asked Jean Valjean. Jean Valjean made no reply.

Honestly I don't have a definite answer myself, but the thought is worth entertaining. :?
Revolution, but civilization


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