Amis and the 1830 Revolution

Any discussion related to Victor's Hugo's Les Misérables, in any language.
Tapferhills
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Amis and the 1830 Revolution

Postby Tapferhills » Fri Aug 09, 2013 6:08 am

Okay, so my apologies if this has been asked and answered before, but I’ve searched and haven’t found it. So here goes:

What were the Amis doing during the 1830 revolution? Were they involved at all? We first see them as a group in 1828, correct?

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Morgan
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Re: Amis and the 1830 Revolution

Postby Morgan » Fri Aug 09, 2013 6:22 am

We first see them in 1828, but we don't then see much of them in the period between 1828 and 1832. As far as 1830 is concerned, we know that Marius was content with the outcome, and that Gavroche was involved (with a gun), but I don't think anything specific is said about the Amis. It's a pretty safe bet that they were doing something, but what exactly isn't described as far as I recall.
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Re: Amis and the 1830 Revolution

Postby Aurelia Combeferre » Fri Aug 09, 2013 6:34 am

They probably were doing something. Maybe even on the barricades at that time; wouldn't put it past them. It would be a good way to have established some connections the likes of what we see in the chapter "Enjolras and His Lieutenants".
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Re: Amis and the 1830 Revolution

Postby deHavilland » Fri Aug 09, 2013 6:35 am

Les Mis in itself is sort of its own world, rife with anachronisms that may or may not have been deliberate - but probably weren't. In not making any major reference to the July Revolution in 1830, Hugo carries on his ideas of hope for the future - which of course are reflected in Enjolras' speeches - making 1832 look more like a failed precursor to the successful revolution of 1848. (We didn't succeed this time, but in the future we will!) As opposed to being the more historically accurate failed follow-up to the events of 1830.

That said, they can pretty well be doing whatever you want during the July Revolution, though their involvement probably would have swayed more towards taking part in one of the 4000 or so barricades that sprang up in the city than say, looting the Tuileries or the Louvre.
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Re: Amis and the 1830 Revolution

Postby Acaila » Fri Aug 09, 2013 3:56 pm

I can't imagine Bahorel *not* being on a barricade if one popped up :D
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Re: Amis and the 1830 Revolution

Postby MmeBahorel » Sat Aug 10, 2013 1:56 am

Hugo leaves annoying gaps because he had serious problems with 1830. As in, he was initially favoured by Charles X, then he got in really well with Louis Philippe, then he was a left-ish (not exactly hard left) deputy after Louis Philippe got overthrown in 1848, then he had serious problems with the June Days.

Hugo and revolution didn't go together as well in theory as in practice, so all of his writings here about 1832 are pretty much his writings about 1848, and that 1830 thing doesn't really matter because he's really trying to salve his conscience about the June Days (since he helped put that down but that may have helped Louis Napoleon since the severe repression made it both possible for the coup to go forward as it did since there was kind of a precedent and made public resistance against the coup impossible because the serious actors were dead, in jail, or in Algeria). Notice he doesn't really rail against Louis Philippe much even though that's who is being fought against in 1832. Because it isn't about Louis Philippe.

If we're looking at what had to have been going on had these characters been real, they absolutely must have been on barricades in July, throwing their weight behind Lafayette. For me, I'm using Lafayette's betrayal as a reason some of the redshirts aren't seen again: some people take failure as absolute, having no more to give after such a result. The ones who stay to die in 1832 obviously aren't that sort, but I'm sure they lost plenty of fellow travelers over the years.
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Re: Amis and the 1830 Revolution

Postby Acaila » Sat Aug 10, 2013 2:00 am

How feasible is it that Les Amis all made it through 1830 unscathed? I don't know enough about it really, but were casualties high or did it all go through reasonably smoothly because of the National Guard turning?
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Re: Amis and the 1830 Revolution

Postby between4walls » Sat Aug 10, 2013 10:37 pm

Most sources I've read say over one thousand and less than two thousand deaths, with deaths from both sides included, though the large majority of deaths being on the insurgent side. I do think it's plausible for them to have all made it out basically okay.
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Re: Amis and the 1830 Revolution

Postby deHavilland » Sat Aug 10, 2013 10:42 pm

And since they're all mentioned at some point in 1832, I think it would be pretty implausible for any of them to have died prior to then anyway. ;) Wounds are wounds, though, it happens.
"Quand vous aurez besoin de Bahorel, capitaine, Bahorel est là! Je sais faire trébucher tous les chevaux du garde-corps avec une ficelle... Rien qu'une petite ficelle. Enfin, pensez à Bahorel du Café Musain!"

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Re: Amis and the 1830 Revolution

Postby Tapferhills » Sun Aug 11, 2013 12:47 am

Great information guys! It’s basically speculation at this point, so what are your personal theories for what they were all doing?

Would they have known what was about to happen and were prepared, or did they just jump in enthusiastically when they saw what was going down?

Would our boys have had any responsibility or would they have been the background noise at that point?

Would they have even all been on the same barricade?

And who would have not been involved? Grantaire? Marius?

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Re: Amis and the 1830 Revolution

Postby deHavilland » Sun Aug 11, 2013 1:20 am

Well, I've written some 35,000 words on Jean Prouvaire acquiring a pet goat, losing it in the midst of the turmoil of the 1830 barricades and Bahorel carrying both the goat and a recently-shot-in-the-shoulder Combeferre to safety - but that's just me.

I think it's reasonable to see them as having been something of a cohesive unit at the time. They're introduced as being a de facto group in 1828, so one would think they might go off to the barricades together or at least with the anticipation of meeting up somewhere near the same place and possibly getting separated in the heat of the moment. The only one I can really think of who might by intent not be with the rest of them is Bahorel, since he has so many affiliations to other groups, it's not unlikely that he might have joined up with some of his other friends.

Grantaire might have joined in with the general fervor of the moment. I've always sort of thought that if Enjolras had asked him to, he would have put forth some show of trying to be helpful at the 1832 barricade. But because he felt he'd been snubbed and was being sulky, he drank himself into a useless stupor. I think this could go either way if you wanted to write it. Marius probably wouldn't have had such an active role. Around this time he'd sort of split ways with the group as a whole and even in 1832 he didn't exactly go to the barricade to help out so much as to get himself killed because boo hoo, Cosette's leaving.
"Quand vous aurez besoin de Bahorel, capitaine, Bahorel est là! Je sais faire trébucher tous les chevaux du garde-corps avec une ficelle... Rien qu'une petite ficelle. Enfin, pensez à Bahorel du Café Musain!"

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Re: Amis and the 1830 Revolution

Postby Acaila » Sun Aug 11, 2013 2:21 am

deHavilland wrote:And since they're all mentioned at some point in 1832, I think it would be pretty implausible for any of them to have died prior to then anyway. ;) Wounds are wounds, though, it happens.


Obviously :P I was wondering if there were perhaps missing Amis, if it was an unlikely coincidence (or not coincidence) that they all made it through, if someone was injured, etc. Plot bunnies, ya know!

Thanks for the figure b4w, do we have a total number of insurgents?
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Re: Amis and the 1830 Revolution

Postby Morgan » Sun Aug 11, 2013 6:25 am

deHavilland wrote:Well, I've written some 35,000 words on Jean Prouvaire acquiring a pet goat, losing it in the midst of the turmoil of the 1830 barricades and Bahorel carrying both the goat and a recently-shot-in-the-shoulder Combeferre to safety - but that's just me.


:shock: that sounds brilliant
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Aurelia Combeferre
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Re: Amis and the 1830 Revolution

Postby Aurelia Combeferre » Sun Aug 11, 2013 6:38 am

Havvy....is this fic of awesome posted somewhere? :D
"...all aptitudes having equal opportunity; politically, all votes having equal weight; religiously, all consciences having equal rights."

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Re: Amis and the 1830 Revolution

Postby deHavilland » Sun Aug 11, 2013 6:45 am

Ah, jeez. No, it's not finished yet. I try not to post stuff episodically until it's done.
"Quand vous aurez besoin de Bahorel, capitaine, Bahorel est là! Je sais faire trébucher tous les chevaux du garde-corps avec une ficelle... Rien qu'une petite ficelle. Enfin, pensez à Bahorel du Café Musain!"


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