Les Gutterables Strikes Back: Book Edition

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lesmisloony
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Re: Les Gutterables Strikes Back: Book Edition

Postby lesmisloony » Wed Apr 21, 2010 5:27 pm

Hey, it's your translation. Me, I'd go with "I have come to make wild, passionate love to you."
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Aurelia Combeferre
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Re: Les Gutterables Strikes Back: Book Edition

Postby Aurelia Combeferre » Wed Apr 21, 2010 5:30 pm

Hahaha! I'm talking about translating it into Filipino (which could read anything from "I have come to stay with you/I have come to share your bed....all the way to the gayest of the gay!) :lol:
"...all aptitudes having equal opportunity; politically, all votes having equal weight; religiously, all consciences having equal rights."

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Patria
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Re: Les Gutterables Strikes Back: Book Edition

Postby Patria » Mon Feb 07, 2011 10:03 pm

These...are really excellent. Here is my meager contribution:

"And what are you doing here?" added Jean Valjean.
"Oh! I am covering my melons."


*has a giggle fit*
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Aurelia Combeferre
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Re: Les Gutterables Strikes Back: Book Edition

Postby Aurelia Combeferre » Tue Feb 08, 2011 8:15 am

I never thought of that as dirty till you mentioned it. :))
"...all aptitudes having equal opportunity; politically, all votes having equal weight; religiously, all consciences having equal rights."

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Patria
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Re: Les Gutterables Strikes Back: Book Edition

Postby Patria » Tue Feb 08, 2011 11:50 pm

Aurelia Combeferre wrote:I never thought of that as dirty till you mentioned it. :))


I think that's how it usually goes in this thread. God knows I never thought of "Take these. Go home. Hide in your room. Let them think you've gone out. They're loaded." that way until you pointed it out. Of course, now I'm going to guffaw loudly every time I read it :P
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Re: Les Gutterables Strikes Back: Book Edition

Postby Kyasurin » Sun Feb 20, 2011 10:40 pm

OOH! This one is my absolute favorite of all time.

"A score of times he had been tempted to fling himself upon Jean Valjean, to seize him and devour him, that is to say, to arrest him."

'Arrest him'? *snicker*
The worst thing you can do is censor yourself as the pencil hits the paper. You must not edit until you get it all on paper. If you can put everything down, stream-of-consciousness, you'll do yourself a service. — Stephen Sondheim

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MmeBahorel
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Re: Les Gutterables Strikes Back: Book Edition

Postby MmeBahorel » Sun Mar 20, 2011 2:51 pm

This is probably Fahnestock/MacAfee only, but it's a good one:

Right after the list of Patron-Minette redshirts, "We will ship some of them and not the worst."

So there you go, canon, or at least authorial permission *g*.

Ok, so in actuality, the French is "Nous en passons, et non des pires", which is a derivation from a line in Hernani, according to Rosa, but my dictionary gives as the modern idiom "J'en passe, et des meilleurs!" (the same phrase from Hernani), meaning "and that's not all, I could go on!" or "and that's the least of them!" So it's kind of a weird translation that should have nothing to do with shipping of any variety, but at least it's a loltastic weird translation :) (really rather along the lines of "I've come to sleep with you" when it's "I've come to sleep at your place" - Hugo didn't write the slashy; the translators did.)
What kind of literature and what kind of life is the same question. - Tom Stoppard

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Re: Les Gutterables Strikes Back: Book Edition

Postby hazellwood » Sun Apr 03, 2011 9:38 pm

MmeBahorel wrote:(really rather along the lines of "I've come to sleep with you" when it's "I've come to sleep at your place" - Hugo didn't write the slashy; the translators did.)

I'd always thought it was the opposite of that. xD (Knowing Courfeyrac, though, he's heard "I've come to sleep at your place" used in multiple ways.)

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Re: Les Gutterables Strikes Back: Book Edition

Postby MmeBahorel » Mon Apr 04, 2011 3:58 am

I have a feeling the latter part of that is correct. What Hugo actually wrote is "Je viens coucher chez toi", "chez toi" being "your place" or "your house". For "sleep with you", it would be "coucher avec toi". As in, "voulez-vous coucher avec moi?"

Courfeyrac can turn "sleep at your place" as slashy as he wants, and i'm sure he can do a bang-up job at it *g*, but it is "sleep at your place".
What kind of literature and what kind of life is the same question. - Tom Stoppard

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Re: Les Gutterables Strikes Back: Book Edition

Postby Floreal » Fri Apr 29, 2011 5:20 pm

I don't know if someone's done this one already, but it's a biggie. This one is from Hapgood's translation of Les Misérables. This one sounds very weird when taken out of context. Very, Very, Very weird. I could take this bit seriously if it weren't for the "mounting on each other's backs" bit. :oops:

CHAPTER XXIII--ORESTES FASTING AND PYLADES DRUNK

At length, by dint of mounting on each other's backs, aiding themselves
with the skeleton of the staircase, climbing up the walls, clinging to
the ceiling, slashing away at the very brink of the trap-door, the last
one who offered resistance, a score of assailants, soldiers, National
Guardsmen, municipal guardsmen, in utter confusion, the majority
disfigured by wounds in the face during that redoubtable ascent, blinded
by blood, furious, rendered savage, made an irruption into the apartment
on the first floor.
Sir, the type of women currently favored in France are toothless crones who just cackle insanely.

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Re: Les Gutterables Strikes Back: Book Edition

Postby Enjolras-the-jaw » Thu Sep 08, 2011 4:15 am

What about Feuilly?! "Above all the great violence of 1772 aroused hin." Also this one: "(on Greece, Poland, Hungry, Romainia, and Italy) He uttered their names incessantly, appropriately and inappropriately *wiggled eyebrows suggestively*."
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Re: Les Gutterables Strikes Back: Book Edition

Postby Trompe-la-Mort » Thu Dec 01, 2011 2:31 pm

I don't know whether I'm relieved or disappointed that most of these don't work in the original French...

I am quite surprised that nobody mentioned Javert's "I ought to be punished"/"I deserve punishment" (whichever translations these are) yet... For once, this is even better in French "Je dois être puni". :twisted:

Apropos translations: I recently picked up a rather old and incredibly dreadful German translation from 1932. The translator uses words and phrases that would have been considered archaic in the early 19th century and he cuts so heavily that sometimes half a sentence is missing. And his word choice is more than once really... suggestive (at least to somebody who speaks modern German).
Leading to the following gems:

Valjean's arrival in Digne: "An einem der ersten Tage des Monats Oktober (...) langte ein Fußwanderer zu der kleinen Stadt Digne hin." This is actually a mistake! "Hingelangen" can mean arrive (with the conotation of difficulty); "hinlangen" (the one the translator used) means "reach out", "grab", "help oneself". So it means: "A man grabbed (something) in the little town of Digne?" So what the heck was Valjean doing there?

After it is said that the husband of Valjean's sister died: "Er ersetzte den Ehemann völlig und unterstützte die Schwester, die ihn aufgezogen hatte" - "He substituted the husband entirely and supported the sister, who had raised him"

Javert confesses to "Madeleine" and tells him about how Champmathieu was arrested and brought to Arras: "Sehen Sie den Finger der Vorsehung?" - "Do you see the finger of providence?" So basically providence was telling them all to fuck off?

Three examples about how cutting half a sentence or even just one word can be really bad:

About Valjean earning 18 sous during pruning season and taking up all kinds of jobs outside the season: "Dann verkaufte er sich und tat was er konnte" - "Then he sold himself and did what he could". Maybe Valjean should have considered that way of making money...

Javert quotes Brevet as saying to Champmathieu: "Wir waren ja zusammen." (verbatim: "After all, we were together") There is no way that (at least nowadays) this sentence would mean anything but "After all, we were a couple."

(If he'd said "Wir waren ja zusammen dort" - "After all we were there together"; there's no way it could have been misunderstood!)

Javert questions Sister Simplice: "Sie haben heute abend keinen Mann gesehen?" - "You haven't seen a man tonight?"

And, the absolute best: Mme Magloire complains about the bishop letting Valjean stay in his house: "Einen solchen Mann aufzunehmen! Ihn mit sich schlafen zu lassen!" - "To take in such a man! To let him sleep with oneself!"
...
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...
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The Bricklayer
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Re: Les Gutterables Strikes Back: Book Edition

Postby The Bricklayer » Fri Mar 23, 2012 5:59 am

Trompe-la-Mort wrote:I don't know whether I'm relieved or disappointed that most of these don't work in the original French...


Probably relieved

I think Courfeyrac's "Monsieur, come home with me," is my favorite so far.

"Unbeknownst to the gravedigger, who was engrossed with his spadeful of earth, Fauchelevent slipped his hand from behind into the pocket, and drew out the white object."
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La_Armada
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Re: Les Gutterables Strikes Back: Book Edition

Postby La_Armada » Sun Oct 21, 2012 4:15 pm

I find it wonderful how translations into different languages result in dirty lines.

This one is admittedly a bit disturbing.
From my Spanish edition:

Un temblor eléctrico recorrió toda la barricada, y se oyó el movimiento de las manos buscando los fusiles.
-¿Quieres mi carabina?- dijo Enjolras al pilluelo.
-Quiero el fusil grande- respondió Gavroche.
Y tomó el fusil de Javert.


Loosely translated:
An electric jolt shook the barricade, and the sound of hands reaching for the fusils was heard.
"Do you want my carbine?" Enjolras asked the rascal [Gavroche]
"I want the big fusil" answered Gavroche.
And so he took Javert's weapon.

Javert seems to be in every other nasty line. Says a lot about his character.

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Aurelia Combeferre
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Re: Les Gutterables Strikes Back: Book Edition

Postby Aurelia Combeferre » Sun Oct 21, 2012 4:28 pm

"Fusil"....okay, that word will now never be sacred for me.

And I swear, it's impossible to translate the "I have come to sleep with you" line literally into Filipino without laughing.
"...all aptitudes having equal opportunity; politically, all votes having equal weight; religiously, all consciences having equal rights."


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