Around the World for Abaisse

Obsess over Harry Potter, regale us with Fluffy's latest escapades, ask for advice on what colour to dye your hair, and continue the raging debate of Pirates vs. Ninjas -- whatever strikes your fancy.
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Gigi
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Re: Around the World for Abaisse

Postby Gigi » Thu May 16, 2013 10:52 am

Hmm, I don't read Finnish literature that much myself and I don't know how widely Finnish works are translated and sold worldwide, but let's see... You definitely should track down Väinö Linna's works if you can. The Unknown Soldier is a mandatory read to everyone in high school, and I thought it was very well written, full of interesting characters. War veterans say that it gives a very true depiction of the Continuation War (1941-1944) – so true in fact, that the book was almost banned and had to be edited a bit before it was thought fit to publish.
Another great work by Linna is the trilogy Under the North Star which covers quite a long period of Finnish history, telling the stories of several generations of one family.
Probably the most "international" of Finnish writers is Mika Waltari, who lived 1908-1979. He wrote a lot and was involved in a Finnish writers' society that wanted to "open up" Finland towards Europe. His most famous book is The Egyptian, which of course isn't about Finland as it takes place in Ancient Egypt, but apparently it was considered a great work worldwide because Hollywood made a film of it somewhere in the fifties :O Waltari also wrote many many books about Helsinki and a series of police novels.
Minna Canth was and still is a very important shaper of the society, she spoke for women and the poor and wrote some well-known plays about her concerns. We still celebrate her birthday on 19th March as the Day of Equality. Fun fact: Finland was the third country in the world to give women the right to vote in 1906, and the first country in the world to have women in the Parliament that same year, and there's a great deal of Canth ideology in this :)
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Acaila
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Re: Around the World for Abaisse

Postby Acaila » Thu May 16, 2013 11:53 am

I wrote up this post on some of my favourite Scottish literature a little while ago: viewtopic.php?f=15&t=1662&p=114998#p114998

It is my own favourites, so misses out a lot of big things, and it is very much contemporary, so nothing pre-20th century. Others people should probably look at are the writings of Robert Burns who is probably our national poet, Walter Scott and Hugh Macdiarmid.

Films are interesting, because it's fun to contrast things that are set in Scotland and things that are actually made in Scotland, because they tend to show two different countries :D
For things that are set in Scotland, well you can always watch Braveheart ;) Just be aware that it's fantastically historically inaccurate and tends to make us giggle or roll our eyes. Rob Roy, with Liam Neeson, is along similar lines even if it doesn't have the same automatic amusement at the mention of the title.
There's also a great black and white comedy called Whisky Galore! that is based on a true story, is very funny, but doesn't really help the stereotypes of the canny drunken Scot.
Brave is obviously quite big, and is about 10 times funnier if you're Scottish and can get all the little references and words they use, though I imagine for non-Scots is maybe not Pixar's best film.

[*]As for films actually made here, one of the most popular among Scots is Gregory's Girl. It's nothing huge in scope, it's just about a boy who falls in love with the girl who replaces him on the school football team, but everyone seems to think it's the best Scottish film of the lot and it has an amazing cast of actors I recognise from theatre. (I just asked my boyfriend what films he thought I should mention to you and I had barely got the words out before he said "GREGORY'S GIRL!" so take that as a recommendation :D)
[*]There's Local Hero, where an American oil executive comes to a little coastal village to buy it out for his company, and the place and the reaction isn't exactly what one would expect.
[*]I am fond of The Wicker Man (the original, not the Nicholas Cage remake which is one of the most hilariously awful films ever). A devoutly religious police officer is sent to a remote island to investigate the disappearance of a young girl, discovers the remote community practices a pagan religion and things get weird ;) And cool! Also Christopher Lee is in it and it's awesome.
[*]Trainspotting is quite a big one. It's about drug addicts in Edinburgh, it's quite famous and has people you will recognise in it.....not much else to say about it really.
[*]I really love a little film called Ring of Bright Water that's about a guy who buys a pet otter and gives up busy London life to go raise it in rural Scotland. It's an adorably cute little film that I always loved as a kid and it makes me cry.
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Prisoner 24653
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Re: Around the World for Abaisse

Postby Prisoner 24653 » Mon Oct 06, 2014 7:31 am

Reviving this topic after quite a long period of inactivity...

The other day, I found a fantastic blog post about Hawaiian history. It goes quite in-depth about the history of the Native Hawaiians, the independent nation they had, the overthrow of their nation as well as some of the other injustices that were committed against them, and where they stand as a culture now. Much of this was covered in units on Hawaiian history I had in school, but there were a few things that I hadn't known before. And certainly, this isn't widely known outside of Hawaii, and I think it's important for people in the US and elsewhere (especially those wanting to visit or move to the Islands) to have some understanding of the history here. Do check it out, and feel free to ask if you'd like to know more! :)

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LaserUnicornJedi
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Re: Around the World for Abaisse

Postby LaserUnicornJedi » Mon Nov 10, 2014 1:47 am

I am from the great province of Quebec, where we love cheese, going to the maple farm around springtime, and Celtic music :D
Pancakes are life.

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CC21106
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Re: Around the World for Abaisse

Postby CC21106 » Tue Feb 07, 2017 5:54 pm

I'm from Texas. I guess that's part of the United States. Halfway across the southern border. Texas has a long coastline and a long border with Mexico, across which there is a lot of trade. The people who live near the border hate the idea of a wall. Politically Texas is very conservative although there are enough of us liberals that we don't feel absolutely isolated.

Texas is bigger than France. It is 800 miles across at the widest point (nearly 1300 km). And that goes to the Texans' heads. They do tend to think of Texas as a country, and it is my belief that Texas as a region will outlast the United States as an entity.

If it weren't for Tennesseans and Mexicans there would be no Texas. There are Germans too, and Czechs and Alsatians. I recall hearing German spoken in a town in Central Texas once. Left over from 1848 when a lot of political refugees settled here. The German and Mexican musicians got together, so the kind of music called Tejano, though in Spanish, has a lot of German sound to it. The present ethnic makeup is mostly "white" and Hispanic with a good number of African-Americans too. It is well-known here that Hispanic people are some of the hardest workers in the country, so the stereotype of the lazy Mexican doesn't get very far here.

The geography ranges from hot, wet swamps in the east to hot, dry deserts in the west, plus the wooded hill country, and some mountains that are nicely cool on top even in the summer. When I say wooded I mean scattered with trees about twice as high as a person, lots of oaks and cedar. Lots of prickly-pear cactus and snakes. Most of the rest of Texas is flat--not pancake flat, though some is, but rolling prairie. Houston is sinking. Literally. There are neighborhoods where the water is several feet high in the abandoned houses.

In the spring the wildflowers carpet the prairie with an amazing array of color. The rest of the year the it is pretty drab.

There are beautiful small rivers with their own little ecosystems along them, cypress trees, cottonwoods, and so on. There used to be huge cane brakes in the flats (cane=smallish bamboo). Miles of nothing but dense cane. That was burned down for farmland.

I saw a quote from an English person in the paper once, asked how did she like Texas. She said, approximately, "I like the way you see people in the native costume walking down the street. You don't see lots of men in kilts in Scotland, for instance." It's true, people spend a lot of time dressed like cowboys here and it's perfectly normal.
Last edited by CC21106 on Tue Feb 07, 2017 6:32 pm, edited 3 times in total.
Don't mess with Texas! We mess up enough by ourselves.
I have actually made bullets like they're doing in my avatar. Then loaded the gun with a ramrod, and shot it. But I'm not feeling real good about guns right now.

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CC21106
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Re: Around the World for Abaisse

Postby CC21106 » Tue Feb 07, 2017 6:00 pm

Acaila wrote:There's Local Hero, where an American oil executive comes to a little coastal village to buy it out for his company, and the place and the reaction isn't exactly what one would expect.

This is a very old thread but I have to reply to this. I loved Local Hero. It took place in Houston (where I was living when I saw it) as well as Scotland (where my husband had lived for 4 years in Troon, a coastal town). The Houston police had a very bad reputation at the time (basically for murdering people) and there was a great scene with a bunch of them with "HOUSTON POLICE" on their jackets just so nobody would miss the point.
Don't mess with Texas! We mess up enough by ourselves.
I have actually made bullets like they're doing in my avatar. Then loaded the gun with a ramrod, and shot it. But I'm not feeling real good about guns right now.

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Acaila
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Re: Around the World for Abaisse

Postby Acaila » Wed Feb 08, 2017 12:01 am

That's an awesome little fact to know :D I wonder whose idea that was to add in! :lol:


CC21106 wrote:I saw a quote from an English person in the paper once, asked how did she like Texas. She said, approximately, "I like the way you see people in the native costume walking down the street. You don't see lots of men in kilts in Scotland, for instance." It's true, people spend a lot of time dressed like cowboys here and it's perfectly normal.


I beg to differ! That's listening to an English person for you though ;). Kilts are totally normal here, but they are mostly formal wear. So like, at a school prom or a wedding, the guys won't wear tuxes, they'll wear kilts - https://justanotherstarryeyedbride.file ... g-0226.jpg
That's not the only place you'll see them though. Sports events are another common one - https://photos.smugmug.com/World-View/F ... _490-L.jpg
And you do sometimes just see a guy in a kilt wandering around for no apparent reason - https://s-media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com/73 ... 8bbdd6.jpg
Revolution: like Christmas come early only with more death
Abaisse Chief/Chef
"Les Amis Fun Package - The Awesome Traits of Each"
"She's basically Enjolras meets Amy Pond"
Sings Stars "way better than Russel Crowe"

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Re: Around the World for Abaisse

Postby deHavilland » Wed Feb 08, 2017 1:37 am

Well, you do see people in kilts at certain places, but not nearly with the kind of frequency that you get people in Texas wearing ten gallons or stetsons and cowboy boots. I lived in the Midland half of Midland-Odessa with my family for a year and within a week my dad was sporting the hats and the boots and the jeans to fit in with everyone else in the neighborhood, lol. (And I definitely didn't see nearly as many people in kilts while in Scotland: but then, you can dress like a cowboy all year.)
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CC21106
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Re: Around the World for Abaisse

Postby CC21106 » Wed Feb 08, 2017 5:09 pm

deHavilland wrote:Well, you do see people in kilts at certain places, but not nearly with the kind of frequency that you get people in Texas wearing ten gallons or stetsons and cowboy boots. I lived in the Midland half of Midland-Odessa with my family for a year and within a week my dad was sporting the hats and the boots and the jeans to fit in with everyone else in the neighborhood, lol. (And I definitely didn't see nearly as many people in kilts while in Scotland: but then, you can dress like a cowboy all year.)
That's true, and if you have one of those sheepskin coats you look even more authentic. Man, I would not want to be a cowboy. What a hard life.

So you lived in West Texas for a while! Interesting. I've never been to Midland-Odessa, but when my brother worked in the oil patch he used to drive in to Midland on occasion just to get some civilized food and a night's sleep in a real bed--the mudloggers shared a camper and it was pretty primitive. And everybody smoked all the time. He can draw, so he used to trade pictures of girls for smokes. No Internet back then. Most of the workers were missing a finger or two. His work didn't get him around the chains and cables so he's still got all his parts (and has since quit smoking). He says when somebody died (which was fairly regularly) when you heard about it you'd say "Har' 'tack?" "Yeah, har' 'tack." From all the smoking and bad food. He lost some good friends out there. It's a tough business.
Don't mess with Texas! We mess up enough by ourselves.
I have actually made bullets like they're doing in my avatar. Then loaded the gun with a ramrod, and shot it. But I'm not feeling real good about guns right now.

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TheRandomPhangirl
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Re: Around the World for Abaisse

Postby TheRandomPhangirl » Wed Feb 08, 2017 5:24 pm

Acaila wrote:
I beg to differ! That's listening to an English person for you though ;).


Oi! :P Having said that, CC21106's anecdote reminded me of a Maupassant story I'm reading where two English tourists have gone to Paris just after the Prussiens conquered it, and they're ignorant and annoying; something tells me Maupassant wasn't far off, the English do have a trend of being annoying tourists.
Said the Englishman. I know, I see the irony.
i have the stereotypical English accent I suppose, called RP or Home Counties, though I lapse into an Essex accent (my native one, still not saying much) every now and then.
I'm the one to shout "Down with Polignac!"

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Acaila
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Re: Around the World for Abaisse

Postby Acaila » Wed Feb 08, 2017 8:07 pm

deHavilland wrote:Well, you do see people in kilts at certain places, but not nearly with the kind of frequency that you get people in Texas wearing ten gallons or stetsons and cowboy boots. I lived in the Midland half of Midland-Odessa with my family for a year and within a week my dad was sporting the hats and the boots and the jeans to fit in with everyone else in the neighborhood, lol. (And I definitely didn't see nearly as many people in kilts while in Scotland: but then, you can dress like a cowboy all year.)


Yeah, they're way more common in the summer for obvious reasons!

I bought a great pair of "authentic" cowboy boots in the US over 15 years ago now. They're just that annoying little bit tight, but I really want a new pair just like them - they're not overly cheesy or anything, just solid black leather in a nice style.

The unironic hats do make me lol though!

I remember when I was a little tiny babeh drama queen, I referred to RP as "drama voice" because every person working in theatre I'd ever met spoke in RP at all times. How times have changed! (for the better imo. Nice to know any of my little squidgy folk pursuing that line of work are likely to stay broad Scots!)
Revolution: like Christmas come early only with more death
Abaisse Chief/Chef
"Les Amis Fun Package - The Awesome Traits of Each"
"She's basically Enjolras meets Amy Pond"
Sings Stars "way better than Russel Crowe"

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CC21106
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Re: Around the World for Abaisse

Postby CC21106 » Sat Apr 08, 2017 11:04 pm

TheRandomPhangirl wrote:i have the stereotypical English accent I suppose, called RP or Home Counties, though I lapse into an Essex accent (my native one, still not saying much) every now and then.

I think in Southern dialect, but when I talk the grammar and vocabulary mysteriously change over to standard American, though the accent still stays the same. I moved to Texas a number of years ago at the age of 10 and should have picked up the Texas accent, but I hated the Texans and wouldn't talk like them so I still talk like a Tennessean. Texans and Tennesseans can tell the difference, but Yankees can't. I do not know how to use the American broadcast accent.
Don't mess with Texas! We mess up enough by ourselves.
I have actually made bullets like they're doing in my avatar. Then loaded the gun with a ramrod, and shot it. But I'm not feeling real good about guns right now.


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