Language learning

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MmeBahorel
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Re: Language learning

Postby MmeBahorel » Sun Feb 27, 2011 9:32 pm

Ok, that makes sense. Well, as much sense as anything will make to an English speaker since we mostly threw out grammar when the Normans came in :) It's interesting what archaisms stick as things get simplified.
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9430
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Re: Language learning

Postby 9430 » Mon Feb 28, 2011 2:49 am

Random comment: I find it really interesting that most English speakers have lost the familiar/formal distinction of address, and yet it is still alive and well around the area where I come from (maybe not in the younger generation though), albeit slightly altered from the original (e.g. thyself=thissen). Do other languages feature dialects which retain archaic grammatical forms?
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Trompe-la-Mort
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Re: Language learning

Postby Trompe-la-Mort » Mon Feb 28, 2011 5:22 pm

That's interesting... Where are you from? Because I was under the impression that any form coming from "thou" was completely and utterly extinct...
German has a few examples of dialects retaining archaic words, but I I don't know any example of archaic grammar forms... Maybe it's rather about an older use of grammar, where we have differences: In most parts of Germany, present perfect is the main/only past tense used in spoken language, but the further you go to the north, the more people also use simple past in spoken language (the typical distinction, which we're also taught at school is that present perfect is used in spoken language and simple past in written language). But one can suspect that long ago, the distinction between the two tenses was similar to the one in English, because every Germanic language that I know (English, Swedish and Dutch) has this distinction.
An example similar to yours might be Swedish: The archaic form of address is "du" as the informal pronoun and in formal situations, you would address people in the third person (i.e. "Does Sir want anything else?"). At some point in the 20th century this got changed to using the second person plural ("ni") as the formal address. But apparently, in some rural regions, the use of the third person as formal address is still used. I've never heard it, but that's what my Swedish teacher told me. Oh, and the king is still addressed like this.
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9430
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Re: Language learning

Postby 9430 » Mon Feb 28, 2011 8:42 pm

I'm from Lancashire, but I know that similar dialects are found across a lot of the N of England, including Yorkshire (see The Secret Garden for an attempt to write it out) and Cheshire. Apparently Cheshire dialect is very much like Middle English, and is virtually indecipherable to anyone from outside the area!

Back to thou/thee, thou is usually said 'tha' e.g. "Can tha make us a brew?"- "Can you make me a cup of tea?", but thee remains as is. It's not really used solely as a familiar address form however, since my Grandma tends to address everyone like that, but rather replaces 'you' as a form of address.
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Ulkis
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Re: Language learning

Postby Ulkis » Wed Mar 09, 2011 7:38 pm

This comic amused me in light of the conversation here. Remember to let your mouse arrow rest a minute over the comic after you're done to see the punchline. (It was written by a native English speaker. I'm pretty sure. Well, the author's Canadian.)

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Rose In Misery
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Re: Language learning

Postby Rose In Misery » Wed Mar 09, 2011 7:57 pm

^Tehehe...that is genius!

On another, dialect related note, anyone fond of rhyming slang (practically a language in itself)?
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Trompe-la-Mort
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Re: Language learning

Postby Trompe-la-Mort » Wed Aug 17, 2011 8:56 pm

Yes, actually. Although I'm hardly able to speak it, the ideas behind it are pure genius. A really amusing kind of slang.
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Col.Despard
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Re: Language learning

Postby Col.Despard » Thu Aug 18, 2011 1:43 am

I'm Australian / British, so the rhyming slang is somewhat obligatory. Common phrases in my circle of friends, either here or in the UK:

"Time to hit the frog and toad" (road)
"Are you all on your Pat?" (Pat Malone/alone)
"Lend me your Britneys" (Britney Spears/ears)
"Lot of Noahs around" (Noah's ark/shark)
"He's a Seppo" (septic tank/yank...said with all affection! Australians can be very harsh with their friends)
"Have a Captain Cook" (Captain Cook/look)
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Trompe-la-Mort
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Re: Language learning

Postby Trompe-la-Mort » Thu Aug 18, 2011 8:59 am

Interesting... I would have thought it is: "Have a butcher's" (Butcher's hook/look)
Is that the difference between Cockney and Australian rhyming slang?
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enjolraslesunicorn
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Re: Language learning

Postby enjolraslesunicorn » Mon Jun 18, 2012 2:14 am

I take French, if that means anything... Don't really know anything, though. It's one of those independent course things, and I never feel like doing it though, so I stink at it. Next year I'm taking it officially.
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Re: Language learning

Postby Enjolras-the-jaw » Fri Jul 06, 2012 4:25 pm

I speak English natively, Hebrew fluently, and am currently learning Spanish. I'd love to learn Latin or Arabic, but I'm not sure if I have the time.
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Re: Language learning

Postby AriadneIS » Sat Jul 07, 2012 4:19 pm

I speak native English and close-to-fluent French/Occitan. I think speaking French is a side effect of being a Mizzy. :D I also speak bits and pieces of (way too many languages) German, Italian, Spanish and Twi. Twi is probably my favorite. :D
For some reason, though, my parents want me to stay in French class, which gives me a block of time with nothing to do every day. At least I'm using it now, as I'm staying in Paris!

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Prisoner 24653
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Re: Language learning

Postby Prisoner 24653 » Mon Jul 09, 2012 6:35 pm

I also love language learning. I speak English and Japanese fluently -- Japanese courtesy of my mother being from Japan, teaching me from birth, and enrolling me in Japanese classes all through primary school (and me continuing on in high school and college). I also know some Hawaiian, since I've lived here all my life. I know a few words and phrases in German, French, Spanish, Swedish, Italian, and Dutch (but more German than the others), mainly due to listening to lots of recordings of musicals in those languages. :lol: And I'd love to learn some Korean, Polish, and Hungarian, since I find those languages gorgeous to listen to.

I have a bit of an odd quirk, as well -- I hate watching English dubs of foreign films, but I enjoy watching foreign dubs of English films (especially ones I know well, or musicals). I actually saw "The Sound of Music" and "Mary Poppins" in Japanese long before I ever saw the English versions. It makes me hope they'll do foreign dubs of LM when that film comes out; at least in French if nothing else!

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Re: Language learning

Postby Charlette-Ollie » Fri Jul 13, 2012 4:21 pm

Another Japanese speaker! Yay! Although... I cannot speak Japanese well at all, and I've been taking classes for maybe 14 years. But I am a Japanese major at university, I am just going to graduate without being able to speak the language with any fluency whatsoever, hahaha.

There's a sort of tradition at my work of jokey name badges as birthday presents. Mine says "linguist" because I am apparently the language person, which is ridiculous because the only language I'm confident in is English. I'm just extremely talented at talking about a wide variety of languages. Perhaps "etymologist" would have suited me better.

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Trompe-la-Mort
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Re: Language learning

Postby Trompe-la-Mort » Fri Jul 13, 2012 7:42 pm

Charlotte-Ollie, I find that especially funny since I'm in a similar situation. I'm known in my group either as the youngest person in that group (even both or Bachelor-students are older than me...) or the person who speaks 20 languages. I don't of course, but the rumour is persistent. I was in Japan recently and nearly every time I introduced myself to someone, the answer was something like "ah, you're the person who speaks 20 languages". I usually answer that this is exaggerated and that I only speak nineteen... It's surprising how many people actually believe it. :wink:
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